Thyme to grow!
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Thyme to grow! At BBC Gardeners’ World Live, we caught up with Plant Expert Lucy Chamberlain for some top tips. If you’re looking for an attractive, versatile herb to grow in the garden, look no further. With over 200 varieties to choose from, thyme is a great herb to add to your kitchen garden, producing white, pink of lilac coloured flowers throughout the summer. Read below to find out how to grow thyme at home, with some help from our friends at BBC Gardeners’ World Magazine, and for Lucy’s tips on what to do once your plants have flowered. /*! elementor - v3.11.1 - 15-02-2023 */ .elementor-widget-divider{--divider-border-style:none;--divider-border-width:1px;--divider-color:#2c2c2c;--divider-icon-size:20px;--divider-element-spacing:10px;--divider-pattern-height:24px;--divider-pattern-size:20px;--divider-pattern-url:none;--divider-pattern-repeat:repeat-x}.elementor-widget-divider .elementor-divider{display:flex}.elementor-widget-divider .elementor-divider__text{font-size:15px;line-height:1;max-width:95%}.elementor-widget-divider .elementor-divider__element{margin:0 var(--divider-element-spacing);flex-shrink:0}.elementor-widget-divider .elementor-icon{font-size:var(--divider-icon-size)}.elementor-widget-divider .elementor-divider-separator{display:flex;margin:0;direction:ltr}.elementor-widget-divider--view-line_icon .elementor-divider-separator,.elementor-widget-divider--view-line_text .elementor-divider-separator{align-items:center}.elementor-widget-divider--view-line_icon .elementor-divider-separator:after,.elementor-widget-divider--view-line_icon .elementor-divider-separator:before,.elementor-widget-divider--view-line_text .elementor-divider-separator:after,.elementor-widget-divider--view-line_text .elementor-divider-separator:before{display:block;content:"";border-bottom:0;flex-grow:1;border-top:var(--divider-border-width) var(--divider-border-style) var(--divider-color)}.elementor-widget-divider--element-align-left .elementor-divider .elementor-divider-separator>.elementor-divider__svg:first-of-type{flex-grow:0;flex-shrink:100}.elementor-widget-divider--element-align-left .elementor-divider-separator:before{content:none}.elementor-widget-divider--element-align-left .elementor-divider__element{margin-left:0}.elementor-widget-divider--element-align-right .elementor-divider .elementor-divider-separator>.elementor-divider__svg:last-of-type{flex-grow:0;flex-shrink:100}.elementor-widget-divider--element-align-right .elementor-divider-separator:after{content:none}.elementor-widget-divider--element-align-right .elementor-divider__element{margin-right:0}.elementor-widget-divider:not(.elementor-widget-divider--view-line_text):not(.elementor-widget-divider--view-line_icon) .elementor-divider-separator{border-top:var(--divider-border-width) var(--divider-border-style) var(--divider-color)}.elementor-widget-divider--separator-type-pattern{--divider-border-style:none}.elementor-widget-divider--separator-type-pattern.elementor-widget-divider--view-line .elementor-divider-separator,.elementor-widget-divider--separator-type-pattern:not(.elementor-widget-divider--view-line) .elementor-divider-separator:after,.elementor-widget-divider--separator-type-pattern:not(.elementor-widget-divider--view-line) .elementor-divider-separator:before,.elementor-widget-divider--separator-type-pattern:not([class*=elementor-widget-divider--view]) .elementor-divider-separator{width:100%;min-height:var(--divider-pattern-height);-webkit-mask-size:var(--divider-pattern-size) 100%;mask-size:var(--divider-pattern-size) 100%;-webkit-mask-repeat:var(--divider-pattern-repeat);mask-repeat:var(--divider-pattern-repeat);background-color:var(--divider-color);-webkit-mask-image:var(--divider-pattern-url);mask-image:var(--divider-pattern-url)}.elementor-widget-divider--no-spacing{--divider-pattern-size:auto}.elementor-widget-divider--bg-round{--divider-pattern-repeat:round}.rtl .elementor-widget-divider .elementor-divider__text{direction:rtl}.e-con-inner>.elementor-widget-divider,.e-con>.elementor-widget-divider{width:var(--container-widget-width,100%);--flex-grow:var(--container-widget-flex-grow)} How to grow:A Mediterranean plant, thyme grows well in the full sun, in well-drained soil. Some varieties of the herb can be planted in gravel gardens, paving cracks, or pots which can be brought indoors in autumn time.Thyme plants thrive in drought conditions and won’t need watering once established. Make sure to plant in a sunny spot – this brings the essential oils to the surface of the leaves, for maximum flavour.An evergreen perennial, thyme leaves can be picked all year round. You can use it straight from the garden in your cooking, or dry it out to store.As thyme is used to dry conditions, you may want to bring your plants indoors in the winter time to avoid losing any plants, especially in wet weather. Avoid watering them and be sure to pot them back outside in spring. /*! elementor - v3.11.1 - 15-02-2023 */ .elementor-widget-image{text-align:center}.elementor-widget-image a{display:inline-block}.elementor-widget-image a img[src$=".svg"]{width:48px}.elementor-widget-image img{vertical-align:middle;display:inline-block} /*! elementor - v3.11.1 - 15-02-2023 */ .elementor-widget-video .elementor-widget-container{overflow:hidden;transform:translateZ(0)}.elementor-widget-video .elementor-wrapper iframe,.elementor-widget-video .elementor-wrapper video{height:100%;width:100%;border:none;background-color:#000}.elementor-widget-video .elementor-open-inline .elementor-custom-embed-image-overlay{position:absolute;top:0;left:0;width:100%;height:100%;background-size:cover;background-position:50%}.elementor-widget-video .elementor-custom-embed-image-overlay{cursor:pointer;text-align:center}.elementor-widget-video .elementor-custom-embed-image-overlay:hover .elementor-custom-embed-play i{opacity:1}.elementor-widget-video .elementor-custom-embed-image-overlay img{display:block;width:100%}.elementor-widget-video .e-hosted-video .elementor-video{-o-object-fit:cover;object-fit:cover}.e-con-inner>.elementor-widget-video,.e-con>.elementor-widget-video{width:var(--container-widget-width);--flex-grow:var(--container-widget-flex-grow)} Trimming back In the summer, thyme plants bloom with beautiful  flowers, that attract plenty of buzzing wildlife. Once the flowers begin to fade, trim them back so that the flowers grow back the following year. Make sure to cut back the plant to continue your harvest through autumn. If thyme plants are left alone to grow, they may become woody and eventually need replacing. Looking for spring inspiration? Discover the Showcase Gardens from Spring Fair here Delve into more garden inspiration, top tips and hear all our latest news
Thyme to grow!
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Thyme to grow! At BBC Gardeners’ World Live, we caught up with Plant Expert Lucy Chamberlain for some top tips. If you’re looking for an attractive, versatile herb to grow in the garden, look no further. With over 200 varieties to choose from, thyme is a great herb to add to your kitchen garden, producing white, pink of lilac coloured flowers throughout the summer. Read below to find out how to grow thyme at home, with some help from our friends at BBC Gardeners’ World Magazine, and for Lucy’s tips on what to do once your plants have flowered. How to grow:A Mediterranean plant, thyme grows well in the full sun, in well-drained soil. Some varieties of the herb can be planted in gravel gardens, paving cracks, or pots which can be brought indoors in autumn time.Thyme plants thrive in drought conditions and won’t need watering once established. Make sure to plant in a sunny spot – this brings the essential oils to the surface of the leaves, for maximum flavour.An evergreen perennial, thyme leaves can be picked all year round. You can use it straight from the garden in your cooking, or dry it out to store.As thyme is used to dry conditions, you may want to bring your plants indoors in the winter time to avoid losing any plants, especially in wet weather. Avoid watering them and be sure to pot them back outside in spring. Trimming back In the summer, thyme plants bloom with beautiful  flowers, that attract plenty of buzzing wildlife. Once the flowers begin to fade, trim them back so that the flowers grow back the following year. Make sure to cut back the plant to continue your harvest through autumn. If thyme plants are left alone to grow, they may become woody and eventually need replacing. The Plant Experts will be at the BBC Gardeners World Autumn Fair, taking exclusive Plant Expert Tours of Audley End’s Kitchen Gardens. Find out more about the tours below… Find out more about the Plant Expert Tours of Audley End's Kitchen Gardens Explore Garden Organic's Potager Garden coming to the Autumn Fair
Thyme to grow!
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Thyme to grow! At BBC Gardeners’ World Live, we caught up with Plant Expert Lucy Chamberlain for some top tips. If you’re looking for an attractive, versatile herb to grow in the garden, look no further. With over 200 varieties to choose from, thyme is a great herb to add to your kitchen garden, producing white, pink of lilac coloured flowers throughout the summer. Read below to find out how to grow thyme at home, with some help from our friends at BBC Gardeners’ World Magazine, and for Lucy’s tips on what to do once your plants have flowered. How to grow:A Mediterranean plant, thyme grows well in the full sun, in well-drained soil. Some varieties of the herb can be planted in gravel gardens, paving cracks, or pots which can be brought indoors in autumn time.Thyme plants thrive in drought conditions and won’t need watering once established. Make sure to plant in a sunny spot – this brings the essential oils to the surface of the leaves, for maximum flavour.An evergreen perennial, thyme leaves can be picked all year round. You can use it straight from the garden in your cooking, or dry it out to store.As thyme is used to dry conditions, you may want to bring your plants indoors in the winter time to avoid losing any plants, especially in wet weather. Avoid watering them and be sure to pot them back outside in spring. Trimming back In the summer, thyme plants bloom with beautiful  flowers, that attract plenty of buzzing wildlife. Once the flowers begin to fade, trim them back so that the flowers grow back the following year. Make sure to cut back the plant to continue your harvest through autumn. If thyme plants are left alone to grow, they may become woody and eventually need replacing. Find out more about the Plant Experts - Lucy Chamberlain and Saul Walker Discover even more top tips, inspiration and our latest news
Plant your own foxglove haven at home
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Plant your own foxglove haven at home Attract bees and wildlife to the garden by featuring foxgloves in your planting scheme. They’re sure to give a burst of colour to any corner of the garden.Foxgloves were a clear favourite at this year’s BBC Gardeners’ World Live at the NEC in Birmingham, appearing in the Beautiful Borders, Show Gardens and throughout the Floral Marquee. Popular in cottage gardens, foxgloves make a lovely addition to the garden, coming in many colours and varieties.With the help of our friends at BBC Gardeners’ World Magazine, we’ve put together some top tips to help you grow your own foxglove haven at home.  The Hideout, inspired by Peaky Blinders in celebration of the BBC’s 100th anniversary, designed by Alex Froggatt. Foxgloves in the Floral Marquee at BBC Gardeners’ World Live Let’s get growing!To start growing foxgloves, sow the seeds in a tray of seed compost. Instead of covering the seed, place a propagator lid or sheet of glass over the tray. Already grown plants can be plotted straight into the garden in spring or autumn.When looking for a spot to plant your foxgloves, it’s important to remember that most varieties of foxgloves prefer the shade and do best in a well-drained, moist soil. What’s more, you might not get flowers the same year you plant. To get your foxgloves to self-seed around the garden for flowers every year, plant them two years in a row.Foxgloves will self-seed on their own in the garden – just avoid deadheading the flowers until seeds have developed and ripened. You can collect the seeds and scatter them where you’d like them to grow, or sow seeds in a tray of compost. Top tipsDeadhead blooms after flowering for a second wind of flowers, or let them self seed over the garden.Protect young plants from slugs and snailsAll parts of foxgloves are poisonous, and can kill an adult human if any of the part is ingested. Avoid this plant if your pets are prone to eating garden plants. Browse the gallery below to get foxglove garden inspiration from the gardens at BBC Gardeners’ World LiveReady to plant? Check out some of the floral features, Beautiful Borders and Show Gardens from BBC Gardeners’ World Live 2022 for ideas of where to plant in your garden, as well as colour schemes and ideas for planting. /*! elementor-pro - v3.11.1 - 15-02-2023 */ .elementor-gallery__container{min-height:1px}.elementor-gallery-item{position:relative;overflow:hidden;display:block;text-decoration:none;border:solid var(--image-border-width) 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Looking for spring inspiration? Discover the Showcase Gardens from Spring Fair here Delve into more garden inspiration, top tips and hear all our latest news
Plant your own foxglove haven at home
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Plant your own foxglove haven at home Attract bees and wildlife to the garden by featuring foxgloves in your planting scheme. They’re sure to give a burst of colour to any corner of the garden.Foxgloves were a clear favourite at this year’s BBC Gardeners’ World Live at the NEC in Birmingham, appearing in the Beautiful Borders, Show Gardens and throughout the Floral Marquee. Popular in cottage gardens, foxgloves make a lovely addition to the garden, coming in many colours and varieties.With the help of our friends at BBC Gardeners’ World Magazine, we’ve put together some top tips to help you grow your own foxglove haven at home.  The Hideout, inspired by Peaky Blinders in celebration of the BBC’s 100th anniversary, designed by Alex Froggatt. Foxgloves in the Floral Marquee at BBC Gardeners’ World Live Let’s get growing!To start growing foxgloves, sow the seeds in a tray of seed compost. Instead of covering the seed, place a propagator lid or sheet of glass over the tray. Already grown plants can be plotted straight into the garden in spring or autumn.When looking for a spot to plant your foxgloves, it’s important to remember that most varieties of foxgloves prefer the shade and do best in a well-drained, moist soil. What’s more, you might not get flowers the same year you plant. To get your foxgloves to self-seed around the garden for flowers every year, plant them two years in a row.Foxgloves will self-seed on their own in the garden – just avoid deadheading the flowers until seeds have developed and ripened. You can collect the seeds and scatter them where you’d like them to grow, or sow seeds in a tray of compost. Top tipsDeadhead blooms after flowering for a second wind of flowers, or let them self seed over the garden.Protect young plants from slugs and snailsAll parts of foxgloves are poisonous, and can kill an adult human if any of the part is ingested. Avoid this plant if your pets are prone to eating garden plants. Browse the gallery below to get foxglove garden inspiration from the gardens at BBC Gardeners’ World LiveReady to plant? Check out some of the floral features, Beautiful Borders and Show Gardens from BBC Gardeners’ World Live 2022 for ideas of where to plant in your garden, as well as colour schemes and ideas for planting. Looking for more garden inspiration? Find out what's on at the Autumn Fair Don't miss a special Plant Expert Tour, for floral highlights of the Fair
Plant your own foxglove haven at home
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Plant your own foxglove haven at home Attract bees and wildlife to the garden by featuring foxgloves in your planting scheme. They’re sure to give a burst of colour to any corner of the garden. Foxgloves were a clear favourite at this year’s BBC Gardeners’ World Live, appearing in the Beautiful Borders, Show Gardens and throughout the Floral Marquee. Popular in cottage gardens, foxgloves make a lovely addition to the garden, coming in many colours and varieties. With the help of our friends at BBC Gardeners’ World Magazine, we’ve put together some top tips to help you grow your own foxglove haven at home.  The Hideout, inspired by Peaky Blinders in celebration of the BBC’s 100th anniversary, designed by Alex Froggatt. Foxgloves in the Floral Marquee at BBC Gardeners’ World Live Let’s get growing!To start growing foxgloves, sow the seeds in a tray of seed compost. Instead of covering the seed, place a propagator lid or sheet of glass over the tray. Already grown plants can be plotted straight into the garden in spring or autumn.When looking for a spot to plant your foxgloves, it’s important to remember that most varieties of foxgloves prefer the shade and do best in a well-drained, moist soil. What’s more, you might not get flowers the same year you plant. To get your foxgloves to self-seed around the garden for flowers every year, plant them two years in a row.Foxgloves will self-seed on their own in the garden – just avoid deadheading the flowers until seeds have developed and ripened. You can collect the seeds and scatter them where you’d like them to grow, or sow seeds in a tray of compost. Top tipsDeadhead blooms after flowering for a second wind of flowers, or let them self seed over the garden.Protect young plants from slugs and snailsAll parts of foxgloves are poisonous, and can kill an adult human if any of the part is ingested. Avoid this plant if your pets are prone to eating garden plants. Browse the gallery below to get foxglove garden inspiration from the gardens at BBC Gardeners’ World LiveReady to plant? Check out some of the floral features, Beautiful Borders and Show Gardens from BBC Gardeners’ World Live 2022 for ideas of where to plant in your garden, as well as colour schemes and ideas for planting. Delve into garden inspiration from the 2022 Show Gardens and Beautiful Borders Discover even more top tips, inspiration and our latest news
Dig into a homegrown raspberry tiramisu
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Dig into a home-grown raspberry tiramisu There’s nothing quite like home-grown raspberries, which is why we’ve put together some top tips on how to grow them, plus a delicious recipe from the BBC Good Food Magazine, as seen at the BBC Good Food Show Summer… If you’ve already planted raspberries, now is about the time they’ll be ready for picking, washing and preparing for the kitchen, whether its a handful of the berries on your cereal, or in a tantalising dessert. With some help from our friends at BBC Gardeners’ World Magazine, we’ve put together some top tips on growing raspberries, accompanied by a delicious raspberry tiramisu recipe from the BBC Good Food Show Magazine, demonstrated at the BBC Good Food Show this summer by Cassie Best on the Italian Kitchen. Planting  In late autumn, or early winter, plant raspberry canes in a sunny spot 45cm apart with 1.8m between rows, in well-drained soil. Before planting, soak the roots in water, and cover the roots with about 5cm of soil. Keep any white buds at the stem base at soil level. In springtime, feed the canes with a general fertiliser and use mulch to keep the roots moist. Summer-fruiting raspberriesThese raspberries fruit after a year. Prune out weak shoots as they develop an tie in new canes with a spacing of 15cm. After fruiting, cut the canes that have produced fruit to soil level. Summer-fruiting canes need a bit more support, so tie them as the grow. Autumn-fruiting raspberriesThese raspberries produce canes that flower and fruit the same year. Cut down the canes in the winter to allow new ones to develop in a wide row the following year. Once shorter, the canes will be able to support each other. Tips for pests and diseasesUse netting to protect the fruit from birds and other small mammalsSometimes raspberry plants suffer from rasperry nutrient deficiency – use a high nitorgen fertiliser and mulch annually to prevent this.You might spot green shield bugs on your plants – these won’t harm your plants so don’t worry about them! Harvesting and what to do nextPick the fruit gently to avoid crushing them. Ripe raspberries will tumble off the plant into your hands.For delicious results, pick and eat our raspberries on the same day.Raspberries can be stored in the fridge, or frozen in a dish to be eaten later.You can also make your harvest into a delicious jam, purée, or smoothie. Feeling inspired? Why not try making a refreshing raspberry tiramisu, using the berrylicious recipe below, as seen at the BBC Good Food Show Summer at the 2022 Show. Find out more below… Raspberry tiramisuThis recipe is from BBC Good Food Magazine, as seen on the Italian Kitchen at the BBC Good Food Show Summer with Cassie Best. Serves 66 egg yolks175g caster sugar300ml pot double cream500g mascarpone1 tbsp vanilla extract24 sponge fingers150ml marsala or sweet wine350g raspberriesicing sugar, to dust Method 1.Put the egg yolks and sugar into a heatproof bowl, set over a pan of simmering water. Whisk until pale, creamy and doubled in volume. Remove from the heat and whisk for 1 minute until cool.2.In another bowl beat the cream, marsala and vanilla extract until combined, thick and creamy. Fold or very gently whisk this mixture into the creamy yolks.3.Dip half the sponge fingers into the marsala and arrange over the bottom of a serving dish. Pour over half of the creamy mixture, then top with most of the raspberries. Repeat the layers, then finish by dotting over the remaining raspberries. Cover and chill for at least 2 hours.4.Dust the tiramisu with icing sugar just before serving in big bowls. Looking for spring inspiration? Discover the Showcase Gardens from Spring Fair here Delve into more garden inspiration, top tips and hear all our latest news
Dig into a homegrown raspberry tiramisu
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Dig into a home-grown raspberry tiramisu There’s nothing quite like home-grown raspberries, which is why we’ve put together some top tips on how to grow them, plus a delicious recipe from the BBC Good Food Magazine, as see at the BBC Good Food Show Summer… If you’ve already planted raspberries, now is about the time they’ll be ready for picking, washing and preparing for the kitchen, whether its a handful of the berries on your cereal, or in a tantalising dessert. With some help from our friends at BBC Gardeners’ World Magazine, we’ve put together some top tips on growing raspberries, accompanied by a delicious raspberry tiramisu recipe from the BBC Good Food Show Magazine, demonstrated at the BBC Good Food Show this summer by Cassie Best on the Italian Kitchen. Planting  In late autumn, or early winter, plant raspberry canes in a sunny spot 45cm apart with 1.8m between rows, in well-drained soil. Before planting, soak the roots in water, and cover the roots with about 5cm of soil. Keep any white buds at the stem base at soil level. In springtime, feed the canes with a general fertiliser and use mulch to keep the roots moist. Summer-fruiting raspberriesThese raspberries fruit after a year. Prune out weak shoots as they develop an tie in new canes with a spacing of 15cm. After fruiting, cut the canes that have produced fruit to soil level. Summer-fruiting canes need a bit more support, so tie them as the grow. Autumn-fruiting raspberriesThese raspberries produce canes that flower and fruit the same year. Cut down the canes in the winter to allow new ones to develop in a wide row the following year. Once shorter, the canes will be able to support each other. Tips for pests and diseasesUse netting to protect the fruit from birds and other small mammalsSometimes raspberry plants suffer from rasperry nutrient deficiency – use a high nitorgen fertiliser and mulch annually to prevent this.You might spot green shield bugs on your plants – these won’t harm your plants so don’t worry about them! Harvesting and what to do nextPick the fruit gently to avoid crushing them. Ripe raspberries will tumble off the plant into your hands.For delicious results, pick and eat our raspberries on the same day.Raspberries can be stored in the fridge, or frozen in a dish to be eaten later.You can also make your harvest into a delicious jam, purée, or smoothie. Feeling inspired? Why not try making a refreshing raspberry tiramisu, using the berrylicious recipe below, as seen at the BBC Good Food Show Summer at the 2022 Show. Find out more below… Raspberry tiramisuThis recipe is from BBC Good Food Magazine, as seen on the Italian Kitchen at the BBC Good Food Show Summer with Cassie Best. Serves 66 egg yolks175g caster sugar300ml pot double cream500g mascarpone1 tbsp vanilla extract24 sponge fingers150ml marsala or sweet wine350g raspberriesicing sugar, to dust Method 1.Put the egg yolks and sugar into a heatproof bowl, set over a pan of simmering water. Whisk until pale, creamy and doubled in volume. Remove from the heat and whisk for 1 minute until cool.2.In another bowl beat the cream, marsala and vanilla extract until combined, thick and creamy. Fold or very gently whisk this mixture into the creamy yolks.3.Dip half the sponge fingers into the marsala and arrange over the bottom of a serving dish. Pour over half of the creamy mixture, then top with most of the raspberries. Repeat the layers, then finish by dotting over the remaining raspberries. Cover and chill for at least 2 hours.4.Dust the tiramisu with icing sugar just before serving in big bowls. Looking for garden inspiration? Find out what's on at the Autumn Fair Find out more about the BBC Good Food Market coming to the Autumn Fair
Dig into a homegrown raspberry tiramisu
0 comment
Dig into a home-grown raspberry tiramisu There’s nothing quite like home-grown raspberries, which is why we’ve put together some top tips on how to grow them, plus a delicious recipe from the BBC Good Food Magazine, as seen at the BBC Good Food Show Summer… If you’ve already planted raspberries, now is about the time they’ll be ready for picking, washing and preparing for the kitchen, whether its a handful of the berries on your cereal, or in a tantalising dessert. With some help from our friends at BBC Gardeners’ World Magazine, we’ve put together some top tips on growing raspberries, accompanied by a delicious raspberry tiramisu recipe  from the BBC Good Food Show Magazine, demonstrated at the BBC Good Food Show this summer by Cassie Best on the Italian Kitchen. Planting  In late autumn, or early winter, plant raspberry canes in a sunny spot 45cm apart with 1.8m between rows, in well-drained soil. Before planting, soak the roots in water, and cover the roots with about 5cm of soil. Keep any white buds at the stem base at soil level. In springtime, feed the canes with a general fertiliser and use mulch to keep the roots moist. Summer-fruiting raspberriesThese raspberries fruit after a year. Prune out weak shoots as they develop an tie in new canes with a spacing of 15cm. After fruiting, cut the canes that have produced fruit to soil level. Summer-fruiting canes need a bit more support, so tie them as the grow. Autumn-fruiting raspberriesThese raspberries produce canes that flower and fruit the same year. Cut down the canes in the winter to allow new ones to develop in a wide row the following year. Once shorter, the canes will be able to support each other. Tips for pests and diseasesUse netting to protect the fruit from birds and other small mammalsSometimes raspberry plants suffer from rasperry nutrient deficiency – use a high nitorgen fertiliser and mulch annually to prevent this.You might spot green shield bugs on your plants – these won’t harm your plants so don’t worry about them! Harvesting and what to do nextPick the fruit gently to avoid crushing them. Ripe raspberries will tumble off the plant into your hands.For delicious results, pick and eat our raspberries on the same day.Raspberries can be stored in the fridge, or frozen in a dish to be eaten later.You can also make your harvest into a delicious jam, purée, or smoothie. Feeling inspired? Why not try making a refreshing raspberry tiramisu, using Cassie Best’s berrylicious recipe, as seen at the BBC Good Food Show Summer at the 2022 Show. Find out more below… Raspberry tiramisuThis recipe is from BBC Good Food Magazine, as seen on the Italian Kitchen at the BBC Good Food Show Summer with Cassie Best.Serves 66 egg yolks175g caster sugar300ml pot double cream500g mascarpone1 tbsp vanilla extract24 sponge fingers150ml marsala or sweet wine350g raspberriesicing sugar, to dust Method 1.Put the egg yolks and sugar into a heatproof bowl, set over a pan of simmering water. Whisk until pale, creamy and doubled in volume. Remove from the heat and whisk for 1 minute until cool.2.In another bowl beat the cream, marsala and vanilla extract until combined, thick and creamy. Fold or very gently whisk this mixture into the creamy yolks.3.Dip half the sponge fingers into the marsala and arrange over the bottom of a serving dish. Pour over half of the creamy mixture, then top with most of the raspberries. Repeat the layers, then finish by dotting over the remaining raspberries. Cover and chill for at least 2 hours.4.Dust the tiramisu with icing sugar just before serving in big bowls. BBC Gardeners’ World Live will be back alongside the BBC Good Food Show Summer from 15-18 June 2023. Find out more below… Delve into garden inspiration from the 2022 Show Gardens and Beautiful Borders Find out more about the BBC Good Food Show Summer

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