Maximise your social media!
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Make the most of social media Are you gearing up to exhibit at one of the BBC Gardeners’ World events this year and looking to maximize your impact both at the event and online?Social media is an indispensable tool for engaging visitors in advance, as well as reaching a broader audience of garden lovers.To help you make the most of this opportunity, our marketing team has brought together a a list of ten actionable tips tailored specifically for exhibitors at the BBC Gardeners’ World Events.From generating buzz before the event to fostering connections with garden enthusiasts during and after, these tips will empower you to leverage social media effectively and elevate your presence at the show. /*! elementor - v3.21.0 - 08-05-2024 */ .elementor-widget-image{text-align:center}.elementor-widget-image a{display:inline-block}.elementor-widget-image a img[src$=".svg"]{width:48px}.elementor-widget-image img{vertical-align:middle;display:inline-block} 1. Create a Buzz Start promoting your participation in the event weeks in advance. Download images from our library to let your customers and followers know you’ll be at the Show. 2. Showcase your products Share photos and videos of specific products that you’ll have at the Show, in the weeks leading up to it. Highlight unique features and reasons to buy. 3. Use Event Hashtags Use the official event hashtags on your posts. This will help increase your visibility to attendees and anyone following the event online. 4. Share video content from you stand : Your stand is like a stage set – it’s the perfect place to create branded videos for social media. Whether it’s how-tos or techniques, share these videos as stories or reels during the event, to demonstrate how to use your products. 5. Encourage social sharing Have Instagrammable moments designed into your stand. Hold competitions for posts, sharing and follows. Even create an area of your stand where visitors will want to take a photo of themselves for their social. Make it fun! 6. Run a Ticket Giveaway Take us up on our offer of a pair of tickets for a social media giveaway. These can help boost your reach and visibility amongst a gardening audience through sharing and commenting. 7. Share visitors posts If visitors share photos or a positive experience about your product, stand or brand, share that content on your own social media channels. It’s a great way to demonstrate happy customers. 8. Offer Exclusive Show offers to your followers Consider an exclusive discount, or free gift at the Show, for your social media followers that they can unlock by coming to your stand and showing that they’re a follower. This is a great way to get engaged customers to your stand. 9. Connect Get connected with fellow exhibitors, influencers and visitors. Always respond to any comments on your posts, saying “looking forward to seeing you there” or similar. This way, you will already have people to connect with on the day. 10. Keep going after the show Keep the momentum going by posting highlights, thanking visitors for shopping at your stand, and continue sharing content created at the show.
International Carrot Day: How to grow ca...
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How to grow carrots: Everything you need to know Discover the vibrant world of home-grown carrots, where flavor reigns supreme, and diversity thrives beyond the confines of the typical grocery store fare. From the familiar orange to the exotic hues of purple, yellow, and white, and even the charmingly rounded varieties perfect for container cultivation, there’s a carrot for every palate and every patch of soil.Embarking on a carrot-growing journey is refreshingly straightforward with a few essential considerations: soil preparation, fending off pesky carrot root flies, and selecting the right varieties tailored to your space and preferences. By sowing seeds successively and mastering storage techniques, you can relish your home-grown bounty nearly year-round. Here’s a step-by-step guide to cultivating carrots from our friends at BBC Gardeners’ World Magazine: Sowing Seeds: Plant carrot seeds sparingly in prepared soil from March to June. Create shallow drills, cover the seeds lightly with sieved soil, and water gently. Within a couple of weeks, you should see the seeds germinate. Avoid thinning to deter carrot root flies, but ensure the area remains weed-free and water as needed. Depending on the variety chosen, expect to harvest fresh carrots in approximately 10-16 weeks post-sowing. Soil Preparation: Pot on into individual pots when the first true leaves appear. Keep potting on if growing in pots or plant out into the greenhouse when night temperatures exceed 10ºC – ensure the soil or compost is free-draining. Feed weekly with a high potash fertiliser once plants have started flowering, and harvest chillies as and when they appear.  Variety Selection: Choose between early and late varieties based on your preferred harvesting timeline. The prime sowing season spans late March to June, but adjustments can be made for earlier or later sowings using protective structures like greenhouses or cloches. Successful Sowing: Extend your harvesting window by sowing seeds every two weeks. Opt for a diverse selection of carrot varieties to stagger your harvest throughout the season. Container Cultivation: Carrots adapt well to container gardening, particularly in environments with heavy or stony soil. Select containers with a minimum depth of 30cm, filling them with well-draining soil or compost. Ensure regular watering, especially during dry spells, and cover containers with fleece to deter carrot root flies. Care and Maintenance: Keep the soil weed-free and water occasionally, aiming for deep root growth. Avoid overwatering to prevent stunted growth. Monitor for bolting, which indicates the plant has flowered and become inedible. Thinning Practices: Sow seeds thinly to minimise the need for thinning, which can attract carrot root flies. If thinning becomes necessary, follow proper techniques to minimise disruption and scent release. Pest Management: Carrot fly infestations pose a significant threat to crops. Consider resistant varieties or employ physical barriers like fine-mesh netting or companion planting with aromatic herbs like onions or garlic to deter pests. Harvesting: Harvest carrots when the soil is moist to prevent breakage. Gently lift them from the ground, and water afterward to settle the soil around remaining roots. /*! elementor - v3.21.0 - 08-05-2024 */ .elementor-column .elementor-spacer-inner{height:var(--spacer-size)}.e-con{--container-widget-width:100%}.e-con-inner>.elementor-widget-spacer,.e-con>.elementor-widget-spacer{width:var(--container-widget-width,var(--spacer-size));--align-self:var(--container-widget-align-self,initial);--flex-shrink:0}.e-con-inner>.elementor-widget-spacer>.elementor-widget-container,.e-con>.elementor-widget-spacer>.elementor-widget-container{height:100%;width:100%}.e-con-inner>.elementor-widget-spacer>.elementor-widget-container>.elementor-spacer,.e-con>.elementor-widget-spacer>.elementor-widget-container>.elementor-spacer{height:100%}.e-con-inner>.elementor-widget-spacer>.elementor-widget-container>.elementor-spacer>.elementor-spacer-inner,.e-con>.elementor-widget-spacer>.elementor-widget-container>.elementor-spacer>.elementor-spacer-inner{height:var(--container-widget-height,var(--spacer-size))}.e-con-inner>.elementor-widget-spacer.elementor-widget-empty,.e-con>.elementor-widget-spacer.elementor-widget-empty{position:relative;min-height:22px;min-width:22px}.e-con-inner>.elementor-widget-spacer.elementor-widget-empty .elementor-widget-empty-icon,.e-con>.elementor-widget-spacer.elementor-widget-empty .elementor-widget-empty-icon{position:absolute;top:0;bottom:0;left:0;right:0;margin:auto;padding:0;width:22px;height:22px} With these guidelines in hand, you’re poised to embark on a rewarding journey into the world of home-grown carrots, from seed to harvest and beyond. Enjoy the bountiful flavours and vibrant colours of your labour, knowing you’ve cultivated a taste of freshness right in your backyard. /*! elementor - v3.21.0 - 08-05-2024 */ .elementor-widget-divider{--divider-border-style:none;--divider-border-width:1px;--divider-color:#0c0d0e;--divider-icon-size:20px;--divider-element-spacing:10px;--divider-pattern-height:24px;--divider-pattern-size:20px;--divider-pattern-url:none;--divider-pattern-repeat:repeat-x}.elementor-widget-divider .elementor-divider{display:flex}.elementor-widget-divider .elementor-divider__text{font-size:15px;line-height:1;max-width:95%}.elementor-widget-divider .elementor-divider__element{margin:0 var(--divider-element-spacing);flex-shrink:0}.elementor-widget-divider .elementor-icon{font-size:var(--divider-icon-size)}.elementor-widget-divider .elementor-divider-separator{display:flex;margin:0;direction:ltr}.elementor-widget-divider--view-line_icon .elementor-divider-separator,.elementor-widget-divider--view-line_text .elementor-divider-separator{align-items:center}.elementor-widget-divider--view-line_icon .elementor-divider-separator:after,.elementor-widget-divider--view-line_icon .elementor-divider-separator:before,.elementor-widget-divider--view-line_text .elementor-divider-separator:after,.elementor-widget-divider--view-line_text .elementor-divider-separator:before{display:block;content:"";border-block-end:0;flex-grow:1;border-block-start:var(--divider-border-width) var(--divider-border-style) var(--divider-color)}.elementor-widget-divider--element-align-left .elementor-divider .elementor-divider-separator>.elementor-divider__svg:first-of-type{flex-grow:0;flex-shrink:100}.elementor-widget-divider--element-align-left .elementor-divider-separator:before{content:none}.elementor-widget-divider--element-align-left .elementor-divider__element{margin-left:0}.elementor-widget-divider--element-align-right .elementor-divider .elementor-divider-separator>.elementor-divider__svg:last-of-type{flex-grow:0;flex-shrink:100}.elementor-widget-divider--element-align-right .elementor-divider-separator:after{content:none}.elementor-widget-divider--element-align-right .elementor-divider__element{margin-right:0}.elementor-widget-divider--element-align-start .elementor-divider .elementor-divider-separator>.elementor-divider__svg:first-of-type{flex-grow:0;flex-shrink:100}.elementor-widget-divider--element-align-start .elementor-divider-separator:before{content:none}.elementor-widget-divider--element-align-start .elementor-divider__element{margin-inline-start:0}.elementor-widget-divider--element-align-end .elementor-divider .elementor-divider-separator>.elementor-divider__svg:last-of-type{flex-grow:0;flex-shrink:100}.elementor-widget-divider--element-align-end .elementor-divider-separator:after{content:none}.elementor-widget-divider--element-align-end .elementor-divider__element{margin-inline-end:0}.elementor-widget-divider:not(.elementor-widget-divider--view-line_text):not(.elementor-widget-divider--view-line_icon) .elementor-divider-separator{border-block-start:var(--divider-border-width) var(--divider-border-style) var(--divider-color)}.elementor-widget-divider--separator-type-pattern{--divider-border-style:none}.elementor-widget-divider--separator-type-pattern.elementor-widget-divider--view-line .elementor-divider-separator,.elementor-widget-divider--separator-type-pattern:not(.elementor-widget-divider--view-line) .elementor-divider-separator:after,.elementor-widget-divider--separator-type-pattern:not(.elementor-widget-divider--view-line) .elementor-divider-separator:before,.elementor-widget-divider--separator-type-pattern:not([class*=elementor-widget-divider--view]) .elementor-divider-separator{width:100%;min-height:var(--divider-pattern-height);-webkit-mask-size:var(--divider-pattern-size) 100%;mask-size:var(--divider-pattern-size) 100%;-webkit-mask-repeat:var(--divider-pattern-repeat);mask-repeat:var(--divider-pattern-repeat);background-color:var(--divider-color);-webkit-mask-image:var(--divider-pattern-url);mask-image:var(--divider-pattern-url)}.elementor-widget-divider--no-spacing{--divider-pattern-size:auto}.elementor-widget-divider--bg-round{--divider-pattern-repeat:round}.rtl .elementor-widget-divider .elementor-divider__text{direction:rtl}.e-con-inner>.elementor-widget-divider,.e-con>.elementor-widget-divider{width:var(--container-widget-width,100%);--flex-grow:var(--container-widget-flex-grow)} Find more grow your own recipes Find out more about the Show
Celebrating women in gardening: Internat...
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Celebrating women in gardening at our BBC Gardeners' World events This International Women’s Day, we are thrilled to shine a spotlight on the remarkable women gardeners who grace our events this year. From nurturing delicate blooms to cultivating thriving ecosystems, these women exemplify dedication, expertise, and passion in the world of gardening. Join us as we celebrate their green thumb and the invaluable contributions they bring to our gardening community. Frances Tophill See Frances Tophill at BBC Gardeners’ World Live on Saturday 17 and Sunday 18 June. Book seats in the BBC Gardeners’ World Live Theatre or drop into the Let’s Talk Plants Stage to see Frances on the stage. Frances is involved with the RHS campaign for school gardening and is passionate about enthusing young people to get into horticulture. She is working on a number of community gardening projects in the South West and is also helping the redevelopment of some costal gardens that were damaged by the 2014 storms. This is a particular passion of hers having grown up by the sea and was also part of her degree specialisation.Frances is a popular choice for gardening talks and has appeared at Blenheim Palace Flower Show, Hampton Court Flower Show and the Eden Project Green Fingers Festival to name a few. Hailing from Deal in Kent, Frances now lives in Exeter having completed her BSc in Horticulture with Plantmanship at the Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh in 2013. Frances got into gardening from an early age, helping out around the garden at home and after overly ambitiously designing a terraced landscape in a planter, given to her by her mum, age 7, she was hooked. As well as all things gardening Frances is a budding crafter and currently doing a pottery course.Frances’ first book, First Time Gardener, was published in 2015 and her 2nd book, Container Gardening will be published in April this year. She has also written a column for Coast magazine on highs and lows of coastal gardening. Sue Kent Sue Kent will be joining us for BBC Gardeners’ World Spring Fair and BBC Gardeners’ World Live in 2024. In 2020, Sue Kent launched her gardening career by sending a viewer’s home video to BBC2 Gardeners’ World; it was such a hit that she is now a regular presenter on the show, winning a Garden Media Award for her efforts.Born with an upper limb disability caused by the drug Thalidomide, Sue used her feet and hands to the garden. From her own life experience and her passion for gardening, Sue is keen to show how gardening can be possible with physical limitations and encourage others to have a go whatever their ability may be. Sue is now RHS ambassador for disability inclusions. In July 2022 Sue received a Silver Gilt medal and The People’s Choice award At RHS Hampton Court Palace Garden Festival for her garden. Nicki Chapman Nicki Chapman will be at BBC Gardeners’ World Live 2024.  Nicki has become a mainstay of the BBC presenting team, being a central figure during the RHS Chelsea Flower Show.She’s a regular presenter for Radio 2, often sitting in for Zoe Ball on the Breakfast Show and Vanessa Feltz on Early Breakfast. She has also hosted three documentaries: The Fuller Picture (an in-depth interview with music entrepreneur Simon Fuller), Here We Come – The Monkees at 50, and Let’s Abba Party.Having started her career as a Promotions Assistant at MCA Records, Nicki quickly become one of the youngest and most successful publicists in the industry. Three years later she moved to RCA Records as Head of TV Promotions, before joining Brilliant! PR Company where she was joint partner for five years. Her vast knowledge of the music industry led Nicki to be a judge on ITV’s Popstars and then subsequently on Pop Idol. Having met with Simon Fuller in the nineties Nicki joined his management company 19 Entertainment in January 2001 as Creative Director, working with artists and personalities such as Annie Lennox, David and Victoria Beckham, Will Young, The Spice Girls, Carrie Underwood and S Club 7.Lockdown presented an opportunity for Nicki to further spread her wings, this time working on a podcast from her home studio called Talking Success where she interviewed some of the biggest names in the media and the arts.Nicki is a proud Ambassador for British Dressage and a keen and active supporter of Teenage Cancer Trust, Childline and Nordoff Robbins Music Therapy. After successful brain surgery in 2019, Nicki is now a passionate Ambassador for The Brain Tumour Charity. Carol Klein See Carol Klein at BBC Gardeners’ World Live on Saturday 17 and Sunday 18 June. Book seats in the BBC Gardeners’ World Live Theatre or drop into the Let’s Talk Plants Stage to see Carol on the stage. Her natural, down-to-earth approach has made her popular and trusted figure. As well as covering all the wonderful shows from Chelsea and Tatton to Hampton Court, Carol has fronted many series, including Grow Your Own Veg and Open Gardens.Carol originally trained as a fine artist and spent many years teaching art in schools and colleges. She started gardening and running a nursery from her home in Devon, and her hobby eventually became a career. She began exhibiting at RHS shows in 1990 and went on to win gold medals at Chelsea, Hampton Court, Westminster and Malvern.Carol first appeared on Gardener’s World in 1989 when Geoff Hamilton did a feature on her garden, Glebe Cottage. Following regular appearances as a guest presenter for both the BBC and Channel 4, she wrote and presented her own six-part series Wild About the Garden in 1998, and two series of Real Gardens. Other television work includes offering gardening expertise on Time Team and Garden Doctors, and appearing as a guest on Water Colour Challenge (all Channel 4).Her extensive writing work includes not only her books – Grow Your Own Veg was a six-month top 20 bestseller, with over 200,000 copies sold – but also her weekly double page spread for Garden News and contributions to the Guardian, the Daily Telegraph, Gardener’s World magazine, Gardens Illustrated, English Garden and Horticulture. Check out five plants she recommends for beautiful blooms here.Carol’s recent series Life in a Cottage Garden, which was filmed at her own gardens at Glebe Cottage has also been made into a book of the same title to accompany the series. And many more incredible women who will be on our stages and offering expert advice at our 2024 events.  BBC Gardeners’ World Events 2024: BBC Gardeners’ World Live, 13-16 June at Birmingham’s NECBBC Gardeners’ World Spring Fair, 3-5 May, Beaulieu HampshireBBC Gardeners’ World Autumn Fair, 30 Aug-1 Sept, Audley End House & Garden BOOK NOW MEET MORE OF OUR FEMALE EXPERTS
Celebrating women in gardening: Internat...
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Celebrating women in gardening at our BBC Gardeners' World events This International Women’s Day, we are thrilled to shine a spotlight on the remarkable women gardeners who grace our events this year. From nurturing delicate blooms to cultivating thriving ecosystems, these women exemplify dedication, expertise, and passion in the world of gardening. Join us as we celebrate their green thumb and the invaluable contributions they bring to our gardening community. Frances Tophill See Frances Tophill at BBC Gardeners’ World Spring and Autumn Fairs, as well as BBC Gardeners’ World Live in June. Frances is involved with the RHS campaign for school gardening and is passionate about enthusing young people to get into horticulture. She is working on a number of community gardening projects in the South West and is also helping the redevelopment of some costal gardens that were damaged by the 2014 storms. This is a particular passion of hers having grown up by the sea and was also part of her degree specialisation.Frances is a popular choice for gardening talks and has appeared at Blenheim Palace Flower Show, Hampton Court Flower Show and the Eden Project Green Fingers Festival to name a few. Hailing from Deal in Kent, Frances now lives in Exeter having completed her BSc in Horticulture with Plantmanship at the Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh in 2013. Frances got into gardening from an early age, helping out around the garden at home and after overly ambitiously designing a terraced landscape in a planter, given to her by her mum, age 7, she was hooked. As well as all things gardening Frances is a budding crafter and currently doing a pottery course.Frances’ first book, First Time Gardener, was published in 2015 and her 2nd book, Container Gardening will be published in April this year. She has also written a column for Coast magazine on highs and lows of coastal gardening. Rachel de Thame See Rachel de Thame at BBC Gardeners’ World Spring Fair and BBC Gardeners’ World Autumn Fair in 2024. Rachel is a broadcaster, writer and passionate gardener. Trained at The English Gardening School, she has been a regular presenter on BBC2’s Gardeners’ World since 1999. Rachel is also a long-term member of the team providing coverage of all the major RHS Flower Shows, for which she co-anchored several episodes in 2021. The author of three gardening books, Rachel is a gardening columnist for the Sunday Times and The Garden magazine for the RHS. Her writing commissions for other publications, include BBC Gardeners’ World Magazine and The Huffington Post.Rachel is Vice President of wild flower charity Plantlife, and an Ambassador for The National Garden Scheme. She has also supported Flowers From the Farm – the network for the UK’s cut flower growers – since its inception.The mother of four children, Rachel’s interests beyond horticulture include the performing and fine arts, history, antiques and crafts of all kinds. She is currently restoring the garden – including walled vegetable, herb and cut flower beds – and interiors at her home in the Cotswolds, where country walks and wildlife spotting are welcome distractions. Sue Kent Sue Kent will be joining us for BBC Gardeners’ World Spring Fair and BBC Gardeners’ World Live in 2024. In 2020, Sue Kent launched her gardening career by sending a viewer’s home video to BBC2 Gardeners’ World; it was such a hit that she is now a regular presenter on the show, winning a Garden Media Award for her efforts.Born with an upper limb disability caused by the drug Thalidomide, Sue used her feet and hands to the garden. From her own life experience and her passion for gardening, Sue is keen to show how gardening can be possible with physical limitations and encourage others to have a go whatever their ability may be. Sue is now RHS ambassador for disability inclusions. In July 2022 Sue received a Silver Gilt medal and The People’s Choice award At RHS Hampton Court Palace Garden Festival for her garden. Nicki Chapman Nicki Chapman will be at BBC Gardeners’ World Live 2024.  Nicki has become a mainstay of the BBC presenting team, being a central figure during the RHS Chelsea Flower Show.She’s a regular presenter for Radio 2, often sitting in for Zoe Ball on the Breakfast Show and Vanessa Feltz on Early Breakfast. She has also hosted three documentaries: The Fuller Picture (an in-depth interview with music entrepreneur Simon Fuller), Here We Come – The Monkees at 50, and Let’s Abba Party.Having started her career as a Promotions Assistant at MCA Records, Nicki quickly become one of the youngest and most successful publicists in the industry. Three years later she moved to RCA Records as Head of TV Promotions, before joining Brilliant! PR Company where she was joint partner for five years. Her vast knowledge of the music industry led Nicki to be a judge on ITV’s Popstars and then subsequently on Pop Idol. Having met with Simon Fuller in the nineties Nicki joined his management company 19 Entertainment in January 2001 as Creative Director, working with artists and personalities such as Annie Lennox, David and Victoria Beckham, Will Young, The Spice Girls, Carrie Underwood and S Club 7.Lockdown presented an opportunity for Nicki to further spread her wings, this time working on a podcast from her home studio called Talking Success where she interviewed some of the biggest names in the media and the arts.Nicki is a proud Ambassador for British Dressage and a keen and active supporter of Teenage Cancer Trust, Childline and Nordoff Robbins Music Therapy. After successful brain surgery in 2019, Nicki is now a passionate Ambassador for The Brain Tumour Charity. Carol Klein See Carol Klein at BBC Gardeners’ World Live on Saturday 17 and Sunday 18 June. Book seats in the BBC Gardeners’ World Live Theatre or drop into the Let’s Talk Plants Stage to see Carol on the stage. Her natural, down-to-earth approach has made her popular and trusted figure. As well as covering all the wonderful shows from Chelsea and Tatton to Hampton Court, Carol has fronted many series, including Grow Your Own Veg and Open Gardens.Carol originally trained as a fine artist and spent many years teaching art in schools and colleges. She started gardening and running a nursery from her home in Devon, and her hobby eventually became a career. She began exhibiting at RHS shows in 1990 and went on to win gold medals at Chelsea, Hampton Court, Westminster and Malvern.Carol first appeared on Gardener’s World in 1989 when Geoff Hamilton did a feature on her garden, Glebe Cottage. Following regular appearances as a guest presenter for both the BBC and Channel 4, she wrote and presented her own six-part series Wild About the Garden in 1998, and two series of Real Gardens. Other television work includes offering gardening expertise on Time Team and Garden Doctors, and appearing as a guest on Water Colour Challenge (all Channel 4).Her extensive writing work includes not only her books – Grow Your Own Veg was a six-month top 20 bestseller, with over 200,000 copies sold – but also her weekly double page spread for Garden News and contributions to the Guardian, the Daily Telegraph, Gardener’s World magazine, Gardens Illustrated, English Garden and Horticulture. Check out five plants she recommends for beautiful blooms here.Carol’s recent series Life in a Cottage Garden, which was filmed at her own gardens at Glebe Cottage has also been made into a book of the same title to accompany the series. And many more incredible women who will be on our stages and offering expert advice at our 2024 events.  BBC Gardeners’ World Events 2024: BBC Gardeners’ World Live, 13-16 June at Birmingham’s NECBBC Gardeners’ World Spring Fair, 3-5 May, Beaulieu HampshireBBC Gardeners’ World Autumn Fair, 30 Aug-1 Sept, Audley End House & Garden BOOK NOW MEET MORE OF OUR FEMALE EXPERTS
Gardening benefits for menopause symptom...
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Newson Health Menopause Garden The Garden:In 2023, Menopause specialist Dr Louise Newson joined forces with award-winning garden designer Ruth Gwynn to create the Newson Health Menopause Show Garden at BBC Gardeners’ World Live 2023.The inspiration:The garden reflected Newson Health’s ethos of inclusive and accessible menopause support for all, creating a tranquil and comfortable space for women to reflect on their health and discover the nutritional and physical power of plants for mental health and wellbeing. We spoke with a number of women who confirmed that, whilst gardening may not be a cure for menopause symptoms, it can certainly help women through it. Here’s what Liz Garrigan said: Name, age, location, jobLiz, 50, Surrey, Self-Employed Gardener Meno or periPerimenopause for about a year Main symptomsAt the start of last year I started feeling overwhelmed with life, waking up a lot in the night and my mind would start racing and a general feeling of “not being able to face”  decision making. I then started to think that maybe I was perimenopausal when the brain fog kicked in as well. I’ve always had a good memory and like to be organised and planning, but my brain really felt vacant at times. Impact of symptoms on your daily lifeThe emotional and physical tiredness coupled brain fog knocked my confidence and made me feel that I didn’t want to do anything, particularly not wanting to engage with social situations or go out in general. Avoidance techniques started to kick in as it felt simpler to take the path which was easiest, even if deep down I knew that I should be seeing people and getting out.  How gardening helps you manage those symptoms.Sometimes when I’d wake up, having finally fallen asleep just before my alarm was due to go off, I’d feel quite anxious for no specific reason – the anxiety could be about “anything and everything”. I noticed that getting myself out to my clients and getting going on the garden I was working in started to reduce the anxiety. I suppose it’s a way of gaining control over negative feelings and making a difference to clients’ gardens that spurred me on. I’ve always been someone who enjoys being outside and some of the days I’ve felt most invigorated and affirmed are in the bad weather with my big coat on.   I think if I had to be inside for most of the day, I’d be very restless. The light and fresh air really helps me manage feelings of anxiety. I also like the peace of gardening and usually the single focus of an activity helps with diminishing difficult emotions and concentration. Being close to nature, whether that’s the wind and rain or birds and worms, brings home the benefits of appreciating simple and natural experiences.    How often you spend time gardening or at the allotmentI garden 5 days a week all day. But also enjoy my own garden at the weekend.  What type of gardening activities do you find particularly helpful for symptomsI’ve noticed that I benefit from two different types of activities. Sometimes something fairly physical like cutting a big hedge, laying manure or digging out plants that have died really helps send out the endorphins – like after a good running or gym session! Other times, I find that something quieter and less physical like tackling a large weeding job where it’s more of a mindful activity clears my head. Either way, the physical act of being outside, the fresh air and being able to stand back and feel fulfilled that a garden looks better is a huge feel good factor.  Some days I like to listen to podcasts but most of the time sounds of nature are restorative. This winter I’ve been buying meal worms to keep in my pockets to feed the ever present robins with. I think gardening full time over the past couple of years has really helped with body strength, whether it’s carrying bags of compost, digging or being able to crouch tending to plants. To compliment this activity, I swim and do yoga once a week each to stretch out.  A brief description of your gardenOur garden at home is a typical sized garden for a terrace house. The front is fully south facing and the back is north. This suits us a family as none of us like to be too hot, so the softer light of the back is a pleasure in the summer.  Our back garden is planted with Roses, both shrub and a rambler, with a couple of large Peonies, Japanese Anemones, Verbenas and Magnolia and Cherry trees. The front is fairly drought inspired due to the summer heat, with a variety of salvias, from Amethyst Lips through to Amistads, planted alongside Pelargoniums and an Olive tree.  Amongst others, I listen to a variety of gardening podcasts and have been inspired to create a wild flower area at the end of the garden this summer. I’m going to leave the grass long and have ordered some Ox Eye Daisies to plant whilst waiting to see what else pops up.  Symptom Stations: The garden featured interactive ‘symptom stations’ exploring different aspects of menopause and perimenopause, with clinicians on hand with information and advice about diet and nutrition, the wide-reaching benefits of gardening, exercise, mindfulness and mental wellbeing.  There was also an area for relaxation, a yoga deck, and an area for outdoor cooking. “It’s been great working with Newson Health on this wonderful space to eat, grow and thrive. The initial brief for the garden was full of wonderful ideas on how a garden can support a woman's journey through the menopause. The aim of this design was to create a garden which could be built on a budget which is affordable and achievable. It is a space in which to reconnect with plants and nature, allowing visitors the opportunity to see what they could achieve in their own gardens.” Ruth Gwynn “It’s well documented that menopause and perimenopause can have a huge impact on mental health. Our aim is for this immersive garden to enable visitors to see the benefits of gardening on both menopause and mental health. BBC Gardeners’ World Live offers the perfect opportunity to connect with visitors and to open up conversations in a safe and calming garden setting.” Dr. Louise Newson Previous Next BBC Gardeners’ World Events 2024: BBC Gardeners’ World Live, 13-16 June at Birmingham’s NECBBC Gardeners’ World Spring Fair, 3-5 May, Beaulieu HampshireBBC Gardeners’ World Autumn Fair, 30 Aug-1 Sept, Audley End House & Garden BOOK NOW
Gardening benefits for menopause symptom...
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Newson Health Menopause Garden The Garden:In 2023, Menopause specialist Dr Louise Newson joined forces with award-winning garden designer Ruth Gwynn to create the Newson Health Menopause Show Garden at BBC Gardeners’ World Live 2023.The inspiration:The garden reflected Newson Health’s ethos of inclusive and accessible menopause support for all, creating a tranquil and comfortable space for women to reflect on their health and discover the nutritional and physical power of plants for mental health and wellbeing. We spoke with a number of women who confirmed that, whilst gardening may not be a cure for menopause symptoms, it can certainly help women through it. Here’s what Liz Garrigan said: Name, age, location, jobLiz, 50, Surrey, Self-Employed Gardener Meno or periPerimenopause for about a year Main symptomsAt the start of last year I started feeling overwhelmed with life, waking up a lot in the night and my mind would start racing and a general feeling of “not being able to face”  decision making. I then started to think that maybe I was perimenopausal when the brain fog kicked in as well. I’ve always had a good memory and like to be organised and planning, but my brain really felt vacant at times. Impact of symptoms on your daily lifeThe emotional and physical tiredness coupled brain fog knocked my confidence and made me feel that I didn’t want to do anything, particularly not wanting to engage with social situations or go out in general. Avoidance techniques started to kick in as it felt simpler to take the path which was easiest, even if deep down I knew that I should be seeing people and getting out.  How gardening helps you manage those symptoms.Sometimes when I’d wake up, having finally fallen asleep just before my alarm was due to go off, I’d feel quite anxious for no specific reason – the anxiety could be about “anything and everything”. I noticed that getting myself out to my clients and getting going on the garden I was working in started to reduce the anxiety. I suppose it’s a way of gaining control over negative feelings and making a difference to clients’ gardens that spurred me on. I’ve always been someone who enjoys being outside and some of the days I’ve felt most invigorated and affirmed are in the bad weather with my big coat on.   I think if I had to be inside for most of the day, I’d be very restless. The light and fresh air really helps me manage feelings of anxiety. I also like the peace of gardening and usually the single focus of an activity helps with diminishing difficult emotions and concentration. Being close to nature, whether that’s the wind and rain or birds and worms, brings home the benefits of appreciating simple and natural experiences.    How often you spend time gardening or at the allotmentI garden 5 days a week all day. But also enjoy my own garden at the weekend.  What type of gardening activities do you find particularly helpful for symptomsI’ve noticed that I benefit from two different types of activities. Sometimes something fairly physical like cutting a big hedge, laying manure or digging out plants that have died really helps send out the endorphins – like after a good running or gym session! Other times, I find that something quieter and less physical like tackling a large weeding job where it’s more of a mindful activity clears my head. Either way, the physical act of being outside, the fresh air and being able to stand back and feel fulfilled that a garden looks better is a huge feel good factor.  Some days I like to listen to podcasts but most of the time sounds of nature are restorative. This winter I’ve been buying meal worms to keep in my pockets to feed the ever present robins with. I think gardening full time over the past couple of years has really helped with body strength, whether it’s carrying bags of compost, digging or being able to crouch tending to plants. To compliment this activity, I swim and do yoga once a week each to stretch out.  A brief description of your gardenOur garden at home is a typical sized garden for a terrace house. The front is fully south facing and the back is north. This suits us a family as none of us like to be too hot, so the softer light of the back is a pleasure in the summer.  Our back garden is planted with Roses, both shrub and a rambler, with a couple of large Peonies, Japanese Anemones, Verbenas and Magnolia and Cherry trees. The front is fairly drought inspired due to the summer heat, with a variety of salvias, from Amethyst Lips through to Amistads, planted alongside Pelargoniums and an Olive tree.  Amongst others, I listen to a variety of gardening podcasts and have been inspired to create a wild flower area at the end of the garden this summer. I’m going to leave the grass long and have ordered some Ox Eye Daisies to plant whilst waiting to see what else pops up.  Symptom Stations: The garden featured interactive ‘symptom stations’ exploring different aspects of menopause and perimenopause, with clinicians on hand with information and advice about diet and nutrition, the wide-reaching benefits of gardening, exercise, mindfulness and mental wellbeing.  There was also an area for relaxation, a yoga deck, and an area for outdoor cooking. “It’s been great working with Newson Health on this wonderful space to eat, grow and thrive. The initial brief for the garden was full of wonderful ideas on how a garden can support a woman's journey through the menopause. The aim of this design was to create a garden which could be built on a budget which is affordable and achievable. It is a space in which to reconnect with plants and nature, allowing visitors the opportunity to see what they could achieve in their own gardens.” Ruth Gwynn “It’s well documented that menopause and perimenopause can have a huge impact on mental health. Our aim is for this immersive garden to enable visitors to see the benefits of gardening on both menopause and mental health. BBC Gardeners’ World Live offers the perfect opportunity to connect with visitors and to open up conversations in a safe and calming garden setting.” Dr. Louise Newson Previous Next BBC Gardeners’ World Events 2024: BBC Gardeners’ World Live, 13-16 June at Birmingham’s NECBBC Gardeners’ World Spring Fair, 3-5 May, Beaulieu HampshireBBC Gardeners’ World Autumn Fair, 30 Aug-1 Sept, Audley End House & Garden BOOK NOW
Gardening benefits for menopause symptom...
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Newson Health Menopause Garden The Garden:In 2023, Menopause specialist Dr Louise Newson joined forces with award-winning garden designer Ruth Gwynn to create the Newson Health Menopause Show Garden at BBC Gardeners’ World Live 2023.The inspiration:The garden reflected Newson Health’s ethos of inclusive and accessible menopause support for all, creating a tranquil and comfortable space for women to reflect on their health and discover the nutritional and physical power of plants for mental health and wellbeing. We spoke with a number of women who confirmed that, whilst gardening may not be a cure for menopause symptoms, it can certainly help women through it. Here’s what Liz said: Name, age, location, jobLiz, 50, Surrey, Self-Employed Gardener Meno or periPerimenopause for about a year Main symptomsAt the start of last year I started feeling overwhelmed with life, waking up a lot in the night and my mind would start racing and a general feeling of “not being able to face”  decision making. I then started to think that maybe I was perimenopausal when the brain fog kicked in as well. I’ve always had a good memory and like to be organised and planning, but my brain really felt vacant at times. Impact of symptoms on your daily lifeThe emotional and physical tiredness coupled brain fog knocked my confidence and made me feel that I didn’t want to do anything, particularly not wanting to engage with social situations or go out in general. Avoidance techniques started to kick in as it felt simpler to take the path which was easiest, even if deep down I knew that I should be seeing people and getting out.  How gardening helps you manage those symptoms.Sometimes when I’d wake up, having finally fallen asleep just before my alarm was due to go off, I’d feel quite anxious for no specific reason – the anxiety could be about “anything and everything”. I noticed that getting myself out to my clients and getting going on the garden I was working in started to reduce the anxiety. I suppose it’s a way of gaining control over negative feelings and making a difference to clients’ gardens that spurred me on. I’ve always been someone who enjoys being outside and some of the days I’ve felt most invigorated and affirmed are in the bad weather with my big coat on.   I think if I had to be inside for most of the day, I’d be very restless. The light and fresh air really helps me manage feelings of anxiety. I also like the peace of gardening and usually the single focus of an activity helps with diminishing difficult emotions and concentration. Being close to nature, whether that’s the wind and rain or birds and worms, brings home the benefits of appreciating simple and natural experiences.    How often you spend time gardening or at the allotmentI garden 5 days a week all day. But also enjoy my own garden at the weekend.  What type of gardening activities do you find particularly helpful for symptomsI’ve noticed that I benefit from two different types of activities. Sometimes something fairly physical like cutting a big hedge, laying manure or digging out plants that have died really helps send out the endorphins – like after a good running or gym session! Other times, I find that something quieter and less physical like tackling a large weeding job where it’s more of a mindful activity clears my head. Either way, the physical act of being outside, the fresh air and being able to stand back and feel fulfilled that a garden looks better is a huge feel good factor.  Some days I like to listen to podcasts but most of the time sounds of nature are restorative. This winter I’ve been buying meal worms to keep in my pockets to feed the ever present robins with. I think gardening full time over the past couple of years has really helped with body strength, whether it’s carrying bags of compost, digging or being able to crouch tending to plants. To compliment this activity, I swim and do yoga once a week each to stretch out.  A brief description of your gardenOur garden at home is a typical sized garden for a terrace house. The front is fully south facing and the back is north. This suits us a family as none of us like to be too hot, so the softer light of the back is a pleasure in the summer.  Our back garden is planted with Roses, both shrub and a rambler, with a couple of large Peonies, Japanese Anemones, Verbenas and Magnolia and Cherry trees. The front is fairly drought inspired due to the summer heat, with a variety of salvias, from Amethyst Lips through to Amistads, planted alongside Pelargoniums and an Olive tree.  Amongst others, I listen to a variety of gardening podcasts and have been inspired to create a wild flower area at the end of the garden this summer. I’m going to leave the grass long and have ordered some Ox Eye Daisies to plant whilst waiting to see what else pops up.  Symptom Stations: The garden featured interactive ‘symptom stations’ exploring different aspects of menopause and perimenopause, with clinicians on hand with information and advice about diet and nutrition, the wide-reaching benefits of gardening, exercise, mindfulness and mental wellbeing.  There was also an area for relaxation, a yoga deck, and an area for outdoor cooking. “It’s been great working with Newson Health on this wonderful space to eat, grow and thrive. The initial brief for the garden was full of wonderful ideas on how a garden can support a woman's journey through the menopause. The aim of this design was to create a garden which could be built on a budget which is affordable and achievable. It is a space in which to reconnect with plants and nature, allowing visitors the opportunity to see what they could achieve in their own gardens.” Ruth Gwynn “It’s well documented that menopause and perimenopause can have a huge impact on mental health. Our aim is for this immersive garden to enable visitors to see the benefits of gardening on both menopause and mental health. BBC Gardeners’ World Live offers the perfect opportunity to connect with visitors and to open up conversations in a safe and calming garden setting.” Dr. Louise Newson Previous Next BBC Gardeners’ World Events 2024: BBC Gardeners’ World Live, 13-16 June at Birmingham’s NECBBC Gardeners’ World Spring Fair, 3-5 May, Beaulieu HampshireBBC Gardeners’ World Autumn Fair, 30 Aug-1 Sept, Audley End House & Garden BOOK NOW
Celebrating women in gardening: Internat...
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Celebrating women in gardening at our BBC Gardeners' World events This International Women’s Day, we are thrilled to shine a spotlight on the remarkable women gardeners who grace our events this year. From nurturing delicate blooms to cultivating thriving ecosystems, these women exemplify dedication, expertise, and passion in the world of gardening. Join us as we celebrate their green thumb and the invaluable contributions they bring to our gardening community. Frances Tophill See Frances Tophill at BBC Gardeners’ World Live on Saturday 17 and Sunday 18 June. Book seats in the BBC Gardeners’ World Live Theatre or drop into the Let’s Talk Plants Stage to see Frances on the stage. Frances is involved with the RHS campaign for school gardening and is passionate about enthusing young people to get into horticulture. She is working on a number of community gardening projects in the South West and is also helping the redevelopment of some costal gardens that were damaged by the 2014 storms. This is a particular passion of hers having grown up by the sea and was also part of her degree specialisation.Frances is a popular choice for gardening talks and has appeared at Blenheim Palace Flower Show, Hampton Court Flower Show and the Eden Project Green Fingers Festival to name a few. Hailing from Deal in Kent, Frances now lives in Exeter having completed her BSc in Horticulture with Plantmanship at the Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh in 2013. Frances got into gardening from an early age, helping out around the garden at home and after overly ambitiously designing a terraced landscape in a planter, given to her by her mum, age 7, she was hooked. As well as all things gardening Frances is a budding crafter and currently doing a pottery course.Frances’ first book, First Time Gardener, was published in 2015 and her 2nd book, Container Gardening will be published in April this year. She has also written a column for Coast magazine on highs and lows of coastal gardening. Sue Kent Sue Kent will be joining us for BBC Gardeners’ World Spring Fair and BBC Gardeners’ World Live in 2024. In 2020, Sue Kent launched her gardening career by sending a viewer’s home video to BBC2 Gardeners’ World; it was such a hit that she is now a regular presenter on the show, winning a Garden Media Award for her efforts.Born with an upper limb disability caused by the drug Thalidomide, Sue used her feet and hands to the garden. From her own life experience and her passion for gardening, Sue is keen to show how gardening can be possible with physical limitations and encourage others to have a go whatever their ability may be. Sue is now RHS ambassador for disability inclusions. In July 2022 Sue received a Silver Gilt medal and The People’s Choice award At RHS Hampton Court Palace Garden Festival for her garden. Nicki Chapman Nicki Chapman will be at BBC Gardeners’ World Live 2024.  Nicki has become a mainstay of the BBC presenting team, being a central figure during the RHS Chelsea Flower Show.She’s a regular presenter for Radio 2, often sitting in for Zoe Ball on the Breakfast Show and Vanessa Feltz on Early Breakfast. She has also hosted three documentaries: The Fuller Picture (an in-depth interview with music entrepreneur Simon Fuller), Here We Come – The Monkees at 50, and Let’s Abba Party.Having started her career as a Promotions Assistant at MCA Records, Nicki quickly become one of the youngest and most successful publicists in the industry. Three years later she moved to RCA Records as Head of TV Promotions, before joining Brilliant! PR Company where she was joint partner for five years. Her vast knowledge of the music industry led Nicki to be a judge on ITV’s Popstars and then subsequently on Pop Idol. Having met with Simon Fuller in the nineties Nicki joined his management company 19 Entertainment in January 2001 as Creative Director, working with artists and personalities such as Annie Lennox, David and Victoria Beckham, Will Young, The Spice Girls, Carrie Underwood and S Club 7.Lockdown presented an opportunity for Nicki to further spread her wings, this time working on a podcast from her home studio called Talking Success where she interviewed some of the biggest names in the media and the arts.Nicki is a proud Ambassador for British Dressage and a keen and active supporter of Teenage Cancer Trust, Childline and Nordoff Robbins Music Therapy. After successful brain surgery in 2019, Nicki is now a passionate Ambassador for The Brain Tumour Charity. Carol Klein See Carol Klein at BBC Gardeners’ World Live on Saturday 17 and Sunday 18 June. Book seats in the BBC Gardeners’ World Live Theatre or drop into the Let’s Talk Plants Stage to see Carol on the stage. Her natural, down-to-earth approach has made her popular and trusted figure. As well as covering all the wonderful shows from Chelsea and Tatton to Hampton Court, Carol has fronted many series, including Grow Your Own Veg and Open Gardens.Carol originally trained as a fine artist and spent many years teaching art in schools and colleges. She started gardening and running a nursery from her home in Devon, and her hobby eventually became a career. She began exhibiting at RHS shows in 1990 and went on to win gold medals at Chelsea, Hampton Court, Westminster and Malvern.Carol first appeared on Gardener’s World in 1989 when Geoff Hamilton did a feature on her garden, Glebe Cottage. Following regular appearances as a guest presenter for both the BBC and Channel 4, she wrote and presented her own six-part series Wild About the Garden in 1998, and two series of Real Gardens. Other television work includes offering gardening expertise on Time Team and Garden Doctors, and appearing as a guest on Water Colour Challenge (all Channel 4).Her extensive writing work includes not only her books – Grow Your Own Veg was a six-month top 20 bestseller, with over 200,000 copies sold – but also her weekly double page spread for Garden News and contributions to the Guardian, the Daily Telegraph, Gardener’s World magazine, Gardens Illustrated, English Garden and Horticulture. Check out five plants she recommends for beautiful blooms here.Carol’s recent series Life in a Cottage Garden, which was filmed at her own gardens at Glebe Cottage has also been made into a book of the same title to accompany the series. And many more incredible women who will be on our stages and offering expert advice at our 2024 events.  BBC Gardeners’ World Events 2024: BBC Gardeners’ World Live, 13-16 June at Birmingham’s NECBBC Gardeners’ World Spring Fair, 3-5 May, Beaulieu HampshireBBC Gardeners’ World Autumn Fair, 30 Aug-1 Sept, Audley End House & Garden BOOK NOW MEET MORE OF OUR FEMALE EXPERTS
6 ways to garden for positive wellbeing
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Transform Your Wellbeing: 6 Expert Gardening Tips As gardeners, you probably already know how beneficial gardening can be to health and wellness but there are certain activities when gardening that can be intentionally enjoyed for specific wellness reasons. I first realised how gardening was improving my overall health when I had abdominal surgery which meant months of lonely recovery. The gentle acts of being outside, observing, sowing seeds and pruning were not just helping me to get moving physically, but mentally gave me so much joy. Gradually as I was getting back to the heavier work of building and mulching, I recognised how the garden nurtured me through the process of recovery and that understanding this process gave me the tools to help others find that all important, intrinsic link to nature, through the joy of gardening. And don’t forget that indoor gardening can have many benefits as well, so filling your home with houseplants is also wonderful – there’s always room for one more plant isn’t there? By Ellen Mary Here’s a few intentional acts of plant care that can really help wellness: 1. Sowing Seeds Sowing seeds is a great activity where the magic of gardening can be felt as you clear noise from your mind and focus in on tiny little pieces of joy, so full of hope for the future. Before you sow the seeds you have chosen to grow, feel them gently in your hand. Move some carefully between your fingertips and focus on the sensation. Some seeds are smooth and round, others are flat and silky. There are many different shape and size seeds, each one with its own identity. As you sow each seed focus in on the moment, imagine what each one will become and what it will encounter during its life in order to grow and flourish. This is good practice as not only will you be relaxing as your mind clears to focus on this one moment in time, but your senses will be stimulated as you touch the seeds and watch them as they fall into the compost. Many are fragrant as well, just like the plant they will become. Fenugreek and Coriander are great examples of seeds with scent. 2. Fulfil your senses with happiness Awakening your senses at any given moment as you step in and through your garden can being such joy. From the cool, morning dew on your bare feet to the alluring fragrance of plants by your patio door. Gardens can be a place to hide away when you need to or enjoy fun, active times with friends and family. Think about how you can stimulate all of your senses and provoke positive emotions. Have you enjoyed an experience in the past that a specific plant reminds you of? Have you any emotions attached to plants such as what you had in your wedding bouquet or perhaps your Grandparent’s favourite flowers. Allow yourself to take a trip down memory. Does the smell of roses remind you of your most loved perfume, or are petunias your parents favourites? Keep in mind these memories when you plan your sensory feast. 3. Incorporating homes for wildlife Creating a home for wildlife is one of the most wonderful aspects in gardening. Part of this is learning to love the mini creatures that are welcome in your garden. From the excitement of seeing your first bee on your plants to hearing the rustling of a hedgehog, creating a biodiverse garden allows you to connect the cycle of life right before your very eyes. Remembering that we are each nature ourselves and we can choose what kind of impact we want to have on our planet means that connectivity between your being and the garden becomes all the more meaningful.Many of our garden creatures are great to help with controlling garden pests. Birds eat aphids and toads each slugs, even wasps play a crucial role. Many different elements come together to create an active and vibrant space and it doesn’t matter how big or small your garden is. Making it a haven for living creatures will in turn bring you joy. 4. Observation is key Take some time out to observe your garden and look closely at your plants, tune in to the sounds you can hear, focus on details and movements, feel the sensations as you touch foliage and relish the taste of edibles on your tongue. Be in the moment where you are entirely aware of your thoughts, emotions and reactions as they arise. We hear the breeze, but are we really ‘listening’ to the sound? As our attention is maxed out in amongst the digital world and distractions of everyday life, it can be an enlightening practice to bring your mind back in to the moment and focus on the natural world around you. The garden brings a host of opportunities to tune in and connect with the natural world for wellbeing. Try this exercise each time you step into your garden:Take five deep breaths. Inhale through your nose and exhale via your month. Breathe in for five seconds and exhale for ten seconds. Breathe for longer or more times if that feels natural to you. When you are relaxed focus in on the below;3 things that you can see3 things that you hear2 things that you touch2 things that you can smell1 thing that you can tasteThese mindful moments can help you take a step away from a busy world and allow yourself time to calm, reset and look after yourself. 5. Companion planting Just as we thrive with companionship, so do plants. As humans, connection with others is part of who we are and can influence who we become. It is one of the most basic needs for us to be happy and healthy, it deepens our sense of purpose. Companions help us to combat loneliness, boost mental stimulation and a supportive network connection invigorates positive wellbeing. It is important to be around people who look out for you and be there to support you as you grow. And, just like us, not all plants enjoy growing next to each other and, just as it is wise to put some distance between yourself and those who have a negative impact on your life, the same applies to plants. A few combinations to try: Marigolds (Tagetes) in any garden can repel whitefly and even carrot root fly plus the spicy scent attracts pollinators who in turn will eat the aphids.Nasturtiums (Tropaeolum majus) are well known to attract black fly which keeps them off your other plants. Caterpillars will also have a feast, again leaving your other crops alone.Thyme (Thymus vulgaris) has a scent that deters black fly and possibly white fly from your cabbages, not to mention the flowers are highly attractive to bees. 6. Houseplant care Looking after houseplants has many benefits for wellness. Not only do houseplants soften a room but bring hope, joy and responsibility. Find some time to not just hurry around and water your houseplants but to also sit amongst them, read, meditate and touch the foliage to see how it feels and look closely at the detail. Give the leaves a wipe and feed or repot as necessary. Getting to know your plants closely is the best way to spot any pests or diseases really quickly. It may well be that plants respond to your touch and voice – so there’s no harm in having a little chat with them either!* Some of this piece is taken from extracts of The Joy of Gardening; the everyday zen of mowing the lawn by Ellen Mary. Available in all good bookshops and online. Find Ellen Mary hosting the House Plant Stage every day of Gardeners’ World Live, Birmingham’s NEC, 13-16 June 2024. BBC Gardeners’ World Events 2024: BBC Gardeners’ World Live, 13-16 June at Birmingham’s NECBBC Gardeners’ World Spring Fair, 3-5 May, Beaulieu HampshireBBC Gardeners’ World Autumn Fair, 30 Aug-1 Sept, Audley End House & Garden BOOK NOW MEET THE EXPERTS * Some of this piece is taken from extracts of The Joy of Gardening; the everyday zen of mowing the lawn by Ellen Mary. Available in all good bookshops and online.
6 ways to garden for positive wellbeing
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Transform Your Wellbeing: 6 Expert Gardening Tips As gardeners, you probably already know how beneficial gardening can be to health and wellness but there are certain activities when gardening that can be intentionally enjoyed for specific wellness reasons. I first realised how gardening was improving my overall health when I had abdominal surgery which meant months of lonely recovery. The gentle acts of being outside, observing, sowing seeds and pruning were not just helping me to get moving physically, but mentally gave me so much joy. Gradually as I was getting back to the heavier work of building and mulching, I recognised how the garden nurtured me through the process of recovery and that understanding this process gave me the tools to help others find that all important, intrinsic link to nature, through the joy of gardening. And don’t forget that indoor gardening can have many benefits as well, so filling your home with houseplants is also wonderful – there’s always room for one more plant isn’t there? By Ellen Mary Here’s a few intentional acts of plant care that can really help wellness: 1. Sowing Seeds Sowing seeds is a great activity where the magic of gardening can be felt as you clear noise from your mind and focus in on tiny little pieces of joy, so full of hope for the future. Before you sow the seeds you have chosen to grow, feel them gently in your hand. Move some carefully between your fingertips and focus on the sensation. Some seeds are smooth and round, others are flat and silky. There are many different shape and size seeds, each one with its own identity. As you sow each seed focus in on the moment, imagine what each one will become and what it will encounter during its life in order to grow and flourish. This is good practice as not only will you be relaxing as your mind clears to focus on this one moment in time, but your senses will be stimulated as you touch the seeds and watch them as they fall into the compost. Many are fragrant as well, just like the plant they will become. Fenugreek and Coriander are great examples of seeds with scent. 2. Fulfil your senses with happiness Awakening your senses at any given moment as you step in and through your garden can being such joy. From the cool, morning dew on your bare feet to the alluring fragrance of plants by your patio door. Gardens can be a place to hide away when you need to or enjoy fun, active times with friends and family. Think about how you can stimulate all of your senses and provoke positive emotions. Have you enjoyed an experience in the past that a specific plant reminds you of? Have you any emotions attached to plants such as what you had in your wedding bouquet or perhaps your Grandparent’s favourite flowers. Allow yourself to take a trip down memory. Does the smell of roses remind you of your most loved perfume, or are petunias your parents favourites? Keep in mind these memories when you plan your sensory feast. 3. Incorporating homes for wildlife Creating a home for wildlife is one of the most wonderful aspects in gardening. Part of this is learning to love the mini creatures that are welcome in your garden. From the excitement of seeing your first bee on your plants to hearing the rustling of a hedgehog, creating a biodiverse garden allows you to connect the cycle of life right before your very eyes. Remembering that we are each nature ourselves and we can choose what kind of impact we want to have on our planet means that connectivity between your being and the garden becomes all the more meaningful.Many of our garden creatures are great to help with controlling garden pests. Birds eat aphids and toads each slugs, even wasps play a crucial role. Many different elements come together to create an active and vibrant space and it doesn’t matter how big or small your garden is. Making it a haven for living creatures will in turn bring you joy. 4. Observation is key Take some time out to observe your garden and look closely at your plants, tune in to the sounds you can hear, focus on details and movements, feel the sensations as you touch foliage and relish the taste of edibles on your tongue. Be in the moment where you are entirely aware of your thoughts, emotions and reactions as they arise. We hear the breeze, but are we really ‘listening’ to the sound? As our attention is maxed out in amongst the digital world and distractions of everyday life, it can be an enlightening practice to bring your mind back in to the moment and focus on the natural world around you. The garden brings a host of opportunities to tune in and connect with the natural world for wellbeing. Try this exercise each time you step into your garden:Take five deep breaths. Inhale through your nose and exhale via your month. Breathe in for five seconds and exhale for ten seconds. Breathe for longer or more times if that feels natural to you. When you are relaxed focus in on the below;3 things that you can see3 things that you hear2 things that you touch2 things that you can smell1 thing that you can tasteThese mindful moments can help you take a step away from a busy world and allow yourself time to calm, reset and look after yourself. 5. Companion planting Just as we thrive with companionship, so do plants. As humans, connection with others is part of who we are and can influence who we become. It is one of the most basic needs for us to be happy and healthy, it deepens our sense of purpose. Companions help us to combat loneliness, boost mental stimulation and a supportive network connection invigorates positive wellbeing. It is important to be around people who look out for you and be there to support you as you grow. And, just like us, not all plants enjoy growing next to each other and, just as it is wise to put some distance between yourself and those who have a negative impact on your life, the same applies to plants. A few combinations to try: Marigolds (Tagetes) in any garden can repel whitefly and even carrot root fly plus the spicy scent attracts pollinators who in turn will eat the aphids.Nasturtiums (Tropaeolum majus) are well known to attract black fly which keeps them off your other plants. Caterpillars will also have a feast, again leaving your other crops alone.Thyme (Thymus vulgaris) has a scent that deters black fly and possibly white fly from your cabbages, not to mention the flowers are highly attractive to bees. 6. Houseplant care Looking after houseplants has many benefits for wellness. Not only do houseplants soften a room but bring hope, joy and responsibility. Find some time to not just hurry around and water your houseplants but to also sit amongst them, read, meditate and touch the foliage to see how it feels and look closely at the detail. Give the leaves a wipe and feed or repot as necessary. Getting to know your plants closely is the best way to spot any pests or diseases really quickly. It may well be that plants respond to your touch and voice – so there’s no harm in having a little chat with them either!* Some of this piece is taken from extracts of The Joy of Gardening; the everyday zen of mowing the lawn by Ellen Mary. Available in all good bookshops and online. Find Ellen Mary hosting the House Plant Stage every day of Gardeners’ World Live, Birmingham’s NEC, 13-16 June 2024. BBC Gardeners’ World Events 2024: BBC Gardeners’ World Live, 13-16 June at Birmingham’s NECBBC Gardeners’ World Spring Fair, 3-5 May, Beaulieu HampshireBBC Gardeners’ World Autumn Fair, 30 Aug-1 Sept, Audley End House & Garden BOOK NOW MEET THE EXPERTS * Some of this piece is taken from extracts of The Joy of Gardening; the everyday zen of mowing the lawn by Ellen Mary. Available in all good bookshops and online.
6 ways to garden for positive wellbeing
0 comment
Transform Your Wellbeing: 6 Expert Gardening Tips As gardeners, you probably already know how beneficial gardening can be to health and wellness but there are certain activities when gardening that can be intentionally enjoyed for specific wellness reasons. I first realised how gardening was improving my overall health when I had abdominal surgery which meant months of lonely recovery. The gentle acts of being outside, observing, sowing seeds and pruning were not just helping me to get moving physically, but mentally gave me so much joy. Gradually as I was getting back to the heavier work of building and mulching, I recognised how the garden nurtured me through the process of recovery and that understanding this process gave me the tools to help others find that all important, intrinsic link to nature, through the joy of gardening. And don’t forget that indoor gardening can have many benefits as well, so filling your home with houseplants is also wonderful – there’s always room for one more plant isn’t there? By Ellen Mary Here’s a few intentional acts of plant care that can really help wellness: 1. Sowing Seeds Sowing seeds is a great activity where the magic of gardening can be felt as you clear noise from your mind and focus in on tiny little pieces of joy, so full of hope for the future. Before you sow the seeds you have chosen to grow, feel them gently in your hand. Move some carefully between your fingertips and focus on the sensation. Some seeds are smooth and round, others are flat and silky. There are many different shape and size seeds, each one with its own identity. As you sow each seed focus in on the moment, imagine what each one will become and what it will encounter during its life in order to grow and flourish. This is good practice as not only will you be relaxing as your mind clears to focus on this one moment in time, but your senses will be stimulated as you touch the seeds and watch them as they fall into the compost. Many are fragrant as well, just like the plant they will become. Fenugreek and Coriander are great examples of seeds with scent. 2. Fulfil your senses with happiness Awakening your senses at any given moment as you step in and through your garden can being such joy. From the cool, morning dew on your bare feet to the alluring fragrance of plants by your patio door. Gardens can be a place to hide away when you need to or enjoy fun, active times with friends and family. Think about how you can stimulate all of your senses and provoke positive emotions. Have you enjoyed an experience in the past that a specific plant reminds you of? Have you any emotions attached to plants such as what you had in your wedding bouquet or perhaps your Grandparent’s favourite flowers. Allow yourself to take a trip down memory. Does the smell of roses remind you of your most loved perfume, or are petunias your parents favourites? Keep in mind these memories when you plan your sensory feast. 3. Incorporating homes for wildlife Creating a home for wildlife is one of the most wonderful aspects in gardening. Part of this is learning to love the mini creatures that are welcome in your garden. From the excitement of seeing your first bee on your plants to hearing the rustling of a hedgehog, creating a biodiverse garden allows you to connect the cycle of life right before your very eyes. Remembering that we are each nature ourselves and we can choose what kind of impact we want to have on our planet means that connectivity between your being and the garden becomes all the more meaningful.Many of our garden creatures are great to help with controlling garden pests. Birds eat aphids and toads each slugs, even wasps play a crucial role. Many different elements come together to create an active and vibrant space and it doesn’t matter how big or small your garden is. Making it a haven for living creatures will in turn bring you joy. 4. Observation is key Take some time out to observe your garden and look closely at your plants, tune in to the sounds you can hear, focus on details and movements, feel the sensations as you touch foliage and relish the taste of edibles on your tongue. Be in the moment where you are entirely aware of your thoughts, emotions and reactions as they arise. We hear the breeze, but are we really ‘listening’ to the sound? As our attention is maxed out in amongst the digital world and distractions of everyday life, it can be an enlightening practice to bring your mind back in to the moment and focus on the natural world around you. The garden brings a host of opportunities to tune in and connect with the natural world for wellbeing. Try this exercise each time you step into your garden:Take five deep breaths. Inhale through your nose and exhale via your month. Breathe in for five seconds and exhale for ten seconds. Breathe for longer or more times if that feels natural to you. When you are relaxed focus in on the below;3 things that you can see3 things that you hear2 things that you touch2 things that you can smell1 thing that you can tasteThese mindful moments can help you take a step away from a busy world and allow yourself time to calm, reset and look after yourself. 5. Companion planting Just as we thrive with companionship, so do plants. As humans, connection with others is part of who we are and can influence who we become. It is one of the most basic needs for us to be happy and healthy, it deepens our sense of purpose. Companions help us to combat loneliness, boost mental stimulation and a supportive network connection invigorates positive wellbeing. It is important to be around people who look out for you and be there to support you as you grow. And, just like us, not all plants enjoy growing next to each other and, just as it is wise to put some distance between yourself and those who have a negative impact on your life, the same applies to plants. A few combinations to try: Marigolds (Tagetes) in any garden can repel whitefly and even carrot root fly plus the spicy scent attracts pollinators who in turn will eat the aphids.Nasturtiums (Tropaeolum majus) are well known to attract black fly which keeps them off your other plants. Caterpillars will also have a feast, again leaving your other crops alone.Thyme (Thymus vulgaris) has a scent that deters black fly and possibly white fly from your cabbages, not to mention the flowers are highly attractive to bees. 6. Houseplant care Looking after houseplants has many benefits for wellness. Not only do houseplants soften a room but bring hope, joy and responsibility. Find some time to not just hurry around and water your houseplants but to also sit amongst them, read, meditate and touch the foliage to see how it feels and look closely at the detail. Give the leaves a wipe and feed or repot as necessary. Getting to know your plants closely is the best way to spot any pests or diseases really quickly. It may well be that plants respond to your touch and voice – so there’s no harm in having a little chat with them either!* Some of this piece is taken from extracts of The Joy of Gardening; the everyday zen of mowing the lawn by Ellen Mary. Available in all good bookshops and online. Find Ellen Mary hosting the House Plant Stage every day of Gardeners’ World Live, Birmingham’s NEC, 13-16 June 2024. BBC Gardeners’ World Events 2024: BBC Gardeners’ World Live, 13-16 June at Birmingham’s NECBBC Gardeners’ World Spring Fair, 3-5 May, Beaulieu HampshireBBC Gardeners’ World Autumn Fair, 30 Aug-1 Sept, Audley End House & Garden BOOK NOW MEET THE EXPERTS * Some of this piece is taken from extracts of The Joy of Gardening; the everyday zen of mowing the lawn by Ellen Mary. Available in all good bookshops and online.

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