Bring birds to your garden this winter
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How to care for birds in your garden this winter The Woodland Trust, who you may have seen at our BBC Gardeners’ World Events earlier this year, have put together some top tips to care for birds in your garden this winter. Read on below to find out more!  Winter can be a difficult time for wildlife. Temperatures plummet and food becomes difficult to find. Insect-eating birds turn to alternative foods, some species travel far and wide, and foraging behaviour adapts, but we can lend a helping hand by providing a welcome source of extra food for birds to turn to in leaner times. Different birds are attracted to certain foods, often reflecting their special adaptations for natural food types. Offer a variety of tempting morsels to maximise your bird table’s wow factor. Where to feed birdsIt’s not only the types of food that tickle particular birds’ fancies, but also where they’re fed. You may have noticed that dunnocks and wrens shy away from bird tables and hanging feeders.Sprinkle crumbled fat balls and seed beneath shrubs for secretive and ground feeding birds. Smear fat mixtures into the cracks and crevices of branches or bark for treecreepers, nuthatches and woodpeckers. And don’t forget to clear feeders and feeding areas of snow after fresh falls as smaller birds can struggle to get through it. Waxwing Planting for birds One of the most satisfying and hassle-free ways to feed birds in winter is to plan ahead and let nature provide. Rowan produces a lasting crop of berries that in bumper years can see birds through for several months. They’re a favourite of mistle thrushes which will guard them jealously from other hungry visitors. Ivy is also a good plant to encourage, its late-ripening berries offering food through the colder months and its evergreen leaves provide the perfect larder for wrens to search out hibernating insects. Redwing Keep it upOnce you start feeding birds, try to keep regular in your topping up habits. While most visitors will adapt and move to new feeding grounds when natural food gradually runs out, a sudden drop off in feeding puts them on the hop. In winter when alternative food sources are already scarce, this could mean the difference between life and death for some.Woodland Trust woods support wild birds year round with food and shelter in their natural environment so even if you don’t have your own outdoor space you can be there for your favourite winter visitors by standing up for trees with the Woodland Trust. To find out more about our work and get involved, click the button below: Blackbird FIND OUT MORE ABOUT WOODLAND TRUST With thanks to /*! elementor - v3.19.0 - 07-02-2024 */ .elementor-widget-divider{--divider-border-style:none;--divider-border-width:1px;--divider-color:#0c0d0e;--divider-icon-size:20px;--divider-element-spacing:10px;--divider-pattern-height:24px;--divider-pattern-size:20px;--divider-pattern-url:none;--divider-pattern-repeat:repeat-x}.elementor-widget-divider .elementor-divider{display:flex}.elementor-widget-divider .elementor-divider__text{font-size:15px;line-height:1;max-width:95%}.elementor-widget-divider .elementor-divider__element{margin:0 var(--divider-element-spacing);flex-shrink:0}.elementor-widget-divider .elementor-icon{font-size:var(--divider-icon-size)}.elementor-widget-divider .elementor-divider-separator{display:flex;margin:0;direction:ltr}.elementor-widget-divider--view-line_icon .elementor-divider-separator,.elementor-widget-divider--view-line_text .elementor-divider-separator{align-items:center}.elementor-widget-divider--view-line_icon .elementor-divider-separator:after,.elementor-widget-divider--view-line_icon .elementor-divider-separator:before,.elementor-widget-divider--view-line_text .elementor-divider-separator:after,.elementor-widget-divider--view-line_text .elementor-divider-separator:before{display:block;content:"";border-block-end:0;flex-grow:1;border-block-start:var(--divider-border-width) var(--divider-border-style) var(--divider-color)}.elementor-widget-divider--element-align-left .elementor-divider .elementor-divider-separator>.elementor-divider__svg:first-of-type{flex-grow:0;flex-shrink:100}.elementor-widget-divider--element-align-left .elementor-divider-separator:before{content:none}.elementor-widget-divider--element-align-left .elementor-divider__element{margin-left:0}.elementor-widget-divider--element-align-right .elementor-divider .elementor-divider-separator>.elementor-divider__svg:last-of-type{flex-grow:0;flex-shrink:100}.elementor-widget-divider--element-align-right .elementor-divider-separator:after{content:none}.elementor-widget-divider--element-align-right .elementor-divider__element{margin-right:0}.elementor-widget-divider--element-align-start .elementor-divider .elementor-divider-separator>.elementor-divider__svg:first-of-type{flex-grow:0;flex-shrink:100}.elementor-widget-divider--element-align-start .elementor-divider-separator:before{content:none}.elementor-widget-divider--element-align-start .elementor-divider__element{margin-inline-start:0}.elementor-widget-divider--element-align-end .elementor-divider .elementor-divider-separator>.elementor-divider__svg:last-of-type{flex-grow:0;flex-shrink:100}.elementor-widget-divider--element-align-end .elementor-divider-separator:after{content:none}.elementor-widget-divider--element-align-end .elementor-divider__element{margin-inline-end:0}.elementor-widget-divider:not(.elementor-widget-divider--view-line_text):not(.elementor-widget-divider--view-line_icon) .elementor-divider-separator{border-block-start:var(--divider-border-width) var(--divider-border-style) var(--divider-color)}.elementor-widget-divider--separator-type-pattern{--divider-border-style:none}.elementor-widget-divider--separator-type-pattern.elementor-widget-divider--view-line .elementor-divider-separator,.elementor-widget-divider--separator-type-pattern:not(.elementor-widget-divider--view-line) .elementor-divider-separator:after,.elementor-widget-divider--separator-type-pattern:not(.elementor-widget-divider--view-line) .elementor-divider-separator:before,.elementor-widget-divider--separator-type-pattern:not([class*=elementor-widget-divider--view]) .elementor-divider-separator{width:100%;min-height:var(--divider-pattern-height);-webkit-mask-size:var(--divider-pattern-size) 100%;mask-size:var(--divider-pattern-size) 100%;-webkit-mask-repeat:var(--divider-pattern-repeat);mask-repeat:var(--divider-pattern-repeat);background-color:var(--divider-color);-webkit-mask-image:var(--divider-pattern-url);mask-image:var(--divider-pattern-url)}.elementor-widget-divider--no-spacing{--divider-pattern-size:auto}.elementor-widget-divider--bg-round{--divider-pattern-repeat:round}.rtl .elementor-widget-divider .elementor-divider__text{direction:rtl}.e-con-inner>.elementor-widget-divider,.e-con>.elementor-widget-divider{width:var(--container-widget-width,100%);--flex-grow:var(--container-widget-flex-grow)} See what happened at BBC Gardeners' World Autumn Fair in 2023 Applications for Beautiful Borders are now open - find out more
Bring birds to your garden this winter
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How to care for birds in your garden this winter The Woodland Trust, who you may have seen at our BBC Gardeners’ World Events earlier this year, have put together some top tips to care for birds in your garden this winter. Read on below to find out more!  Winter can be a difficult time for wildlife. Temperatures plummet and food becomes difficult to find. Insect-eating birds turn to alternative foods, some species travel far and wide, and foraging behaviour adapts, but we can lend a helping hand by providing a welcome source of extra food for birds to turn to in leaner times. Different birds are attracted to certain foods, often reflecting their special adaptations for natural food types. Offer a variety of tempting morsels to maximise your bird table’s wow factor. Where to feed birdsIt’s not only the types of food that tickle particular birds’ fancies, but also where they’re fed. You may have noticed that dunnocks and wrens shy away from bird tables and hanging feeders.Sprinkle crumbled fat balls and seed beneath shrubs for secretive and ground feeding birds. Smear fat mixtures into the cracks and crevices of branches or bark for treecreepers, nuthatches and woodpeckers. And don’t forget to clear feeders and feeding areas of snow after fresh falls as smaller birds can struggle to get through it. Waxwing Planting for birds One of the most satisfying and hassle-free ways to feed birds in winter is to plan ahead and let nature provide. Rowan produces a lasting crop of berries that in bumper years can see birds through for several months. They’re a favourite of mistle thrushes which will guard them jealously from other hungry visitors. Ivy is also a good plant to encourage, its late-ripening berries offering food through the colder months and its evergreen leaves provide the perfect larder for wrens to search out hibernating insects. Redwing Keep it upOnce you start feeding birds, try to keep regular in your topping up habits. While most visitors will adapt and move to new feeding grounds when natural food gradually runs out, a sudden drop off in feeding puts them on the hop. In winter when alternative food sources are already scarce, this could mean the difference between life and death for some.Woodland Trust woods support wild birds year round with food and shelter in their natural environment so even if you don’t have your own outdoor space you can be there for your favourite winter visitors by standing up for trees with the Woodland Trust. To find out more about our work and get involved, click the button below: Blackbird FIND OUT MORE ABOUT WOODLAND TRUST With thanks to See what's on at BBC Gardeners' World Spring Fair in 2024! Applications for Beautiful Borders are now open - click to find out more!
Bring birds to your garden this winter
0 comment
How to care for birds in your garden this winter The Woodland Trust, who you may have seen at our BBC Gardeners’ World Events earlier this year, have put together some top tips to care for birds in your garden this winter. Read on below to find out more!  Winter can be a difficult time for wildlife. Temperatures plummet and food becomes difficult to find. Insect-eating birds turn to alternative foods, some species travel far and wide, and foraging behaviour adapts, but we can lend a helping hand by providing a welcome source of extra food for birds to turn to in leaner times. Different birds are attracted to certain foods, often reflecting their special adaptations for natural food types. Offer a variety of tempting morsels to maximise your bird table’s wow factor. Where to feed birdsIt’s not only the types of food that tickle particular birds’ fancies, but also where they’re fed. You may have noticed that dunnocks and wrens shy away from bird tables and hanging feeders.Sprinkle crumbled fat balls and seed beneath shrubs for secretive and ground feeding birds. Smear fat mixtures into the cracks and crevices of branches or bark for treecreepers, nuthatches and woodpeckers. And don’t forget to clear feeders and feeding areas of snow after fresh falls as smaller birds can struggle to get through it. Waxwing Planting for birds One of the most satisfying and hassle-free ways to feed birds in winter is to plan ahead and let nature provide. Rowan produces a lasting crop of berries that in bumper years can see birds through for several months. They’re a favourite of mistle thrushes which will guard them jealously from other hungry visitors. Ivy is also a good plant to encourage, its late-ripening berries offering food through the colder months and its evergreen leaves provide the perfect larder for wrens to search out hibernating insects. Redwing Keep it upOnce you start feeding birds, try to keep regular in your topping up habits. While most visitors will adapt and move to new feeding grounds when natural food gradually runs out, a sudden drop off in feeding puts them on the hop. In winter when alternative food sources are already scarce, this could mean the difference between life and death for some.Woodland Trust woods support wild birds year round with food and shelter in their natural environment so even if you don’t have your own outdoor space you can be there for your favourite winter visitors by standing up for trees with the Woodland Trust. To find out more about our work and get involved, click the button below: Blackbird FIND OUT MORE ABOUT WOODLAND TRUST With thanks to See what's on at BBC Gardeners' World Live in 2024 Applications for Beautiful Borders are now open - find out more
Time to grow: asparagus
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Time to grow: asparagus This November, add asparagus to your vegetable patch for a delicious addition to your summer table with some advice from BBC Gardeners’ World Magazine. What’s more, you’ll be able to put your asparagus to use with a delicious gnocchi with asaparagus, lemon and ricotta recipe, as seen on the Summer Kitchen with Chris Baber at the BBC Good Food Show Summer 2023. Asparagus is a tasty vegetable that grows every summer. Some may think it’s hard to grow asparagus because it needs a lot of space and time. It’s true that you won’t get any shoots to eat in the beginning, but after a few years, it’s definitely worth it. Plus, once you get it going, taking care of the asparagus is not too difficult, and you can enjoy it for up to 20 years. How to growAsparagus plants thrive in soil that gets a lot of light and can drain well. If your soil is heavy, you can still grow asparagus, but it’s a good idea to build a raised bed for it. Pick a sunny spot and make sure the soil is well-prepared with lots of natural material like compost, and make sure it’s free from weeds.If you happen to get an existing asparagus bed, it’s best not to replace it with new plants. If you want to grow more asparagus, find a different spot that doesn’t have asparagus diseases. Also, avoid planting asparagus where you previously grew potatoes.Asparagus can be raised from seed, but the most reliable method is to plant one-year-old dormant plants called ‘crowns’ in March. Some varieties can also be planted in autumn.  PlantingWhen you plant new asparagus crowns, make sure to give them enough water and keep the area free from weeds. Let the crowns grow lots of feathery leaves so they can become healthy and strong. It’s important not to pick any asparagus during the first two years because it will make the plants weaker. At the end of the growing season, trim the foliage to about 10 centimeters above the ground, and in the fall, cover the area with compost that has decomposed well. Also, make sure to keep the area free from weeds and remove any asparagus beetles you see in the spring. CareAfter you plant asparagus, avoid picking any for the first two years. When the third year rolls around, you can start harvesting in mid-April when the spears reach about 18 centimeters in height. Use a sharp knife to cut them about 2.5 centimeters below the soil level. If the weather is warm, you can pick them every two to three days for about four weeks. In the following years, you can harvest over a longer period.Stop gathering asparagus around mid-June. This break allows the plant to store energy for the next year. It’s also a good time to provide some general fertilizer to the plants. Problem solvingKeep an eye out for asparagus beetles from late spring onward. If you spot any tiny bugs or adult beetles, remove and destroy them. At the end of the year, burn the old asparagus stems to get rid of any beetles that might be hiding for the winter.Asparagus can also suffer from a disease called violet crown rot, which makes the base of the plants rot. If this happens, you’ll need to dig up the affected plants, burn them, and start fresh in a new spot Gnocchi with asparagus, lemon and ricotta As seen on the Summer Kitchen with Chris Baber at the BBC Good Food Show Summer 2023. Serves 2500g shop bought gnocchi2 tbsp olive oil2 garlic cloves, sliced250g asparagus, cut into bite-sized piecesknob of butterhandful of grated parmesan1 tbsp lemon juiceZest of 1/2 lemon 4 tbsp ricottahandful of rocket leavesdrizzle extra virgin oil, to serve  Cook the gnocchi in a large pan of boiling water for a couple of minutes until it rises to the surface. Drain and allow to steam-dry in the strainer for 2 mins.While the gnocchi is cooking, heat 1 tbsp oil in a large frying pan over a medium hear. Add the garlic and asparagus with a pinch of salt and pepper, plus 2 tbsp water from the gnocchi pan to create some steam, then cook for 3 mins stirring now and again. Transfer the cooked asparagus to a plate.Put the pan back on a medium-high heat. Add the remaining oil to the pan with the butter. When the butter has melted and starts to foam, add the gnocchi. Fry for a couple of minutes until slightly golden.Add the asparagus back to the pan with a splash of water, the grated parmesan and the zest of half the lemon. Toss together for a minute, then stir through the riccota, a squeeze of lemon juice and seasoning.Serve up, then top with a handful of rocket and a drizzle of extra virgin olive oil. Find more grow your own recipes Find out more about the Fair
Time to grow: asparagus
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Time to grow: asparagus This November, add asparagus to your vegetable patch for a delicious addition to your summer table with some advice from BBC Gardeners’ World Magazine. What’s more, you’ll be able to put your asparagus to use with a delicious gnocchi with asaparagus, lemon and ricotta recipe, as seen on the Summer Kitchen with Chris Baber at the BBC Good Food Show Summer 2023. Asparagus is a tasty vegetable that grows every summer. Some may think it’s hard to grow asparagus because it needs a lot of space and time. It’s true that you won’t get any shoots to eat in the beginning, but after a few years, it’s definitely worth it. Plus, once you get it going, taking care of the asparagus is not too difficult, and you can enjoy it for up to 20 years. How to growAsparagus plants thrive in soil that gets a lot of light and can drain well. If your soil is heavy, you can still grow asparagus, but it’s a good idea to build a raised bed for it. Pick a sunny spot and make sure the soil is well-prepared with lots of natural material like compost, and make sure it’s free from weeds.If you happen to get an existing asparagus bed, it’s best not to replace it with new plants. If you want to grow more asparagus, find a different spot that doesn’t have asparagus diseases. Also, avoid planting asparagus where you previously grew potatoes.Asparagus can be raised from seed, but the most reliable method is to plant one-year-old dormant plants called ‘crowns’ in March. Some varieties can also be planted in autumn.  PlantingWhen you plant new asparagus crowns, make sure to give them enough water and keep the area free from weeds. Let the crowns grow lots of feathery leaves so they can become healthy and strong. It’s important not to pick any asparagus during the first two years because it will make the plants weaker. At the end of the growing season, trim the foliage to about 10 centimeters above the ground, and in the fall, cover the area with compost that has decomposed well. Also, make sure to keep the area free from weeds and remove any asparagus beetles you see in the spring. CareAfter you plant asparagus, avoid picking any for the first two years. When the third year rolls around, you can start harvesting in mid-April when the spears reach about 18 centimeters in height. Use a sharp knife to cut them about 2.5 centimeters below the soil level. If the weather is warm, you can pick them every two to three days for about four weeks. In the following years, you can harvest over a longer period.Stop gathering asparagus around mid-June. This break allows the plant to store energy for the next year. It’s also a good time to provide some general fertilizer to the plants. Problem solvingKeep an eye out for asparagus beetles from late spring onward. If you spot any tiny bugs or adult beetles, remove and destroy them. At the end of the year, burn the old asparagus stems to get rid of any beetles that might be hiding for the winter.Asparagus can also suffer from a disease called violet crown rot, which makes the base of the plants rot. If this happens, you’ll need to dig up the affected plants, burn them, and start fresh in a new spot Gnocchi with asparagus, lemon and ricotta As seen on the Summer Kitchen with Chris Baber at the BBC Good Food Show Summer 2023. Serves 2500g shop bought gnocchi2 tbsp olive oil2 garlic cloves, sliced250g asparagus, cut into bite-sized piecesknob of butterhandful of grated parmesan1 tbsp lemon juiceZest of 1/2 lemon 4 tbsp ricottahandful of rocket leavesdrizzle extra virgin oil, to serve  Cook the gnocchi in a large pan of boiling water for a couple of minutes until it rises to the surface. Drain and allow to steam-dry in the strainer for 2 mins.While the gnocchi is cooking, heat 1 tbsp oil in a large frying pan over a medium hear. Add the garlic and asparagus with a pinch of salt and pepper, plus 2 tbsp water from the gnocchi pan to create some steam, then cook for 3 mins stirring now and again. Transfer the cooked asparagus to a plate.Put the pan back on a medium-high heat. Add the remaining oil to the pan with the butter. When the butter has melted and starts to foam, add the gnocchi. Fry for a couple of minutes until slightly golden.Add the asparagus back to the pan with a splash of water, the grated parmesan and the zest of half the lemon. Toss together for a minute, then stir through the riccota, a squeeze of lemon juice and seasoning.Serve up, then top with a handful of rocket and a drizzle of extra virgin olive oil. Let's Grow Stage at the Spring Fair Find out more about the Fair
Time to grow: asparagus
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Time to grow: asparagus This November, add asparagus to your vegetable patch for a delicious addition to your summer table with some advice from BBC Gardeners’ World Magazine. What’s more, you’ll be able to put your asparagus to use with a delicious gnocchi with asaparagus, lemon and ricotta recipe, as seen on the Summer Kitchen with Chris Baber at the BBC Good Food Show Summer 2023. Asparagus is a tasty vegetable that grows every summer. Some may think it’s hard to grow asparagus because it needs a lot of space and time. It’s true that you won’t get any shoots to eat in the beginning, but after a few years, it’s definitely worth it. Plus, once you get it going, taking care of the asparagus is not too difficult, and you can enjoy it for up to 20 years. How to growAsparagus plants thrive in soil that gets a lot of light and can drain well. If your soil is heavy, you can still grow asparagus, but it’s a good idea to build a raised bed for it. Pick a sunny spot and make sure the soil is well-prepared with lots of natural material like compost, and make sure it’s free from weeds.If you happen to get an existing asparagus bed, it’s best not to replace it with new plants. If you want to grow more asparagus, find a different spot that doesn’t have asparagus diseases. Also, avoid planting asparagus where you previously grew potatoes.Asparagus can be raised from seed, but the most reliable method is to plant one-year-old dormant plants called ‘crowns’ in March. Some varieties can also be planted in autumn.  PlantingWhen you plant new asparagus crowns, make sure to give them enough water and keep the area free from weeds. Let the crowns grow lots of feathery leaves so they can become healthy and strong. It’s important not to pick any asparagus during the first two years because it will make the plants weaker. At the end of the growing season, trim the foliage to about 10 centimeters above the ground, and in the fall, cover the area with compost that has decomposed well. Also, make sure to keep the area free from weeds and remove any asparagus beetles you see in the spring. CareAfter you plant asparagus, avoid picking any for the first two years. When the third year rolls around, you can start harvesting in mid-April when the spears reach about 18 centimeters in height. Use a sharp knife to cut them about 2.5 centimeters below the soil level. If the weather is warm, you can pick them every two to three days for about four weeks. In the following years, you can harvest over a longer period.Stop gathering asparagus around mid-June. This break allows the plant to store energy for the next year. It’s also a good time to provide some general fertilizer to the plants. Problem solvingKeep an eye out for asparagus beetles from late spring onward. If you spot any tiny bugs or adult beetles, remove and destroy them. At the end of the year, burn the old asparagus stems to get rid of any beetles that might be hiding for the winter.Asparagus can also suffer from a disease called violet crown rot, which makes the base of the plants rot. If this happens, you’ll need to dig up the affected plants, burn them, and start fresh in a new spot Gnocchi with asparagus, lemon and ricotta As seen on the Summer Kitchen with Chris Baber at the BBC Good Food Show Summer 2023. Serves 2500g shop bought gnocchi2 tbsp olive oil2 garlic cloves, sliced250g asparagus, cut into bite-sized piecesknob of butterhandful of grated parmesan1 tbsp lemon juiceZest of 1/2 lemon 4 tbsp ricottahandful of rocket leavesdrizzle extra virgin oil, to serve  Cook the gnocchi in a large pan of boiling water for a couple of minutes until it rises to the surface. Drain and allow to steam-dry in the strainer for 2 mins.While the gnocchi is cooking, heat 1 tbsp oil in a large frying pan over a medium hear. Add the garlic and asparagus with a pinch of salt and pepper, plus 2 tbsp water from the gnocchi pan to create some steam, then cook for 3 mins stirring now and again. Transfer the cooked asparagus to a plate.Put the pan back on a medium-high heat. Add the remaining oil to the pan with the butter. When the butter has melted and starts to foam, add the gnocchi. Fry for a couple of minutes until slightly golden.Add the asparagus back to the pan with a splash of water, the grated parmesan and the zest of half the lemon. Toss together for a minute, then stir through the riccota, a squeeze of lemon juice and seasoning.Serve up, then top with a handful of rocket and a drizzle of extra virgin olive oil. Find more grow your own recipes Find out more about the Show
Zöe’s Story: Taking a Tea Break
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Zöe's Story: Taking a ‘Tea Break’ At BBC Gardeners’ World Autumn Fair 2023, Zöe Defoe designed and created the ‘Tea Break’ Beautiful Border. Zöe’s Border was inspired by the concept of having a conversation over a cup of tea and cake whilst listening to bird song, surrounded by beautiful and scented flowers and plants that you have grown is one of the great pleasures that a garden brings.  As part of her Beautiful Border, Zöe decided to raise awareness for the Addison’s Disease Self-Help Group (ADSHG). Find out more about her journey creating her Beautiful Border below. If you are interested in designing and creating your own Beautiful Border at one of the BBC Gardeners’ World Events in 2024, click here to find out more > Written by Zöe Defoe In early September, I exhibited my first show border for the BBC Gardener’s World Autumn Fair. It had been months in the planning, and it involved conquering a lot of my personal fears to be able to do it. I had a lot of anxiety in the lead-up to the show and a lot of fatigue throughout, as well as managing the early September heatwave! That said I had an absolutely amazing time meeting lots of other like-minded people, celebrity gardeners and designers and learning lots along the way.  The theme this year was ‘My Garden Escape’. I chose to use grasses and lots of bright colourful flowers to create the feeling of seclusion, sanctuary and also joy. I also set up a bistro table and chairs laid with a tea set – the perfect place to sit and relax and appreciate your surroundings. I called my border, ‘Tea Break’ which ended up being used as a pun by many! I was lucky enough to achieve a silver medal. Why ADSHG?I was diagnosed with Addison’s disease in 2017 after years of asking doctors to find out why I was so sick and tired all the time. I had already been diagnosed with Graves’ disease aged 10, and B12 deficiency in my twenties. I subsequently developed Hypothyroidism and later also had shingles. At the point of diagnosis with Addison’s disease at the age of 37, I was very unwell but grateful that my persistence had paid off and, by all accounts, just in the nick of time! I wasn’t happy with my first endocrinologist so requested to move to another hospital and my care has been amazing! I was also informed about the ADSHG. The information and social media content from the ADSHG has been phenomenal. I’ve also been able to take part in research projects that have been shared by ADSHG through social media and will soon be doing a Professional Doctorate myself looking at autoimmune conditions. Addison’s and meI think the hardest thing for me upon diagnosis was getting used to taking medication three times a day and knowing when to up-dose. Since then, it’s the weight gain that has been the hardest to deal with, I feel like my body has changed a lot, so it has been about accepting those changes. I get bad bouts of fatigue and pain from time to time and have to listen to my body and rest when this happens. Why Gardening?I found gardening helped me to slow down, process my thoughts and gently exercise. It is a great stress buster. It is also a great reward to see something you have sown grow into an amazing flower, fruit or vegetable. I am a strong advocate for therapeutic horticulture. A garden is both a place to gently work and a sanctuary. My design shows the beautiful balance between the two – the seating area a retreat at the back of the border, the gardener’s gloves and tools at the front.Tea break symbolises the need to pause and take notice of your surroundings – something especially important to me upon my diagnosis with Addison’s disease. A garden is never finished, it’s constantly changing and evolving. As Lao Tzu said, ‘nature does not hurry, yet all is accomplished.’What better way to escape to the garden than with a ‘Tea Break’? If you’d like to donate and contribute to Zöe’s fundraiser, or find out more about the Addison’s Disease Self-Help Group (ADSHG) click the buttons below.  Zöe's fundraiser Addison's Disease Self-Help Group Zöe's Beautiful Border Apply to bring a Beautiful Border to 2024
One ticket, so many opportunities!
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Discover everything included in your ticket to BBC Gardeners' World Live! One ticket, a Show-load of summer inspiration!In this helpful guide you can uncover all the garden inspiration to be had with a ticket to the BBC Gardeners’ World Live in June 2024. Don’t forget, your ticket includes entry to the BBC Good Food Show Summer, so that’s two events, just one ticket… BOOK YOUR TICKETS NOW The ultimate gardening day out awaits... We can’t wait for another Show next summer filled with garden inspiration, expert advice, tip-top shopping, live entertainment and much more! Save the date for 13-16 June 2024. WHAT'S ON /*! elementor - v3.19.0 - 07-02-2024 */ .elementor-widget-video .elementor-widget-container{overflow:hidden;transform:translateZ(0)}.elementor-widget-video .elementor-wrapper{aspect-ratio:var(--video-aspect-ratio)}.elementor-widget-video .elementor-wrapper iframe,.elementor-widget-video .elementor-wrapper video{height:100%;width:100%;display:flex;border:none;background-color:#000}@supports not (aspect-ratio:1/1){.elementor-widget-video .elementor-wrapper{position:relative;overflow:hidden;height:0;padding-bottom:calc(100% / var(--video-aspect-ratio))}.elementor-widget-video .elementor-wrapper iframe,.elementor-widget-video .elementor-wrapper video{position:absolute;top:0;right:0;bottom:0;left:0}}.elementor-widget-video .elementor-open-inline .elementor-custom-embed-image-overlay{position:absolute;top:0;right:0;bottom:0;left:0;background-size:cover;background-position:50%}.elementor-widget-video .elementor-custom-embed-image-overlay{cursor:pointer;text-align:center}.elementor-widget-video .elementor-custom-embed-image-overlay:hover .elementor-custom-embed-play i{opacity:1}.elementor-widget-video .elementor-custom-embed-image-overlay img{display:block;width:100%;aspect-ratio:var(--video-aspect-ratio);-o-object-fit:cover;object-fit:cover;-o-object-position:center center;object-position:center center}@supports not (aspect-ratio:1/1){.elementor-widget-video .elementor-custom-embed-image-overlay{position:relative;overflow:hidden;height:0;padding-bottom:calc(100% / var(--video-aspect-ratio))}.elementor-widget-video .elementor-custom-embed-image-overlay img{position:absolute;top:0;right:0;bottom:0;left:0}}.elementor-widget-video .e-hosted-video .elementor-video{-o-object-fit:cover;object-fit:cover}.e-con-inner>.elementor-widget-video,.e-con>.elementor-widget-video{width:var(--container-widget-width);--flex-grow:var(--container-widget-flex-grow)} Top experts, entertaining and informative talksThere’s no better place to find a Show-load of expert advice. Catch the experts on the BBC Gardeners’ World Live Theatre as they share topical tips and seasonal advice to help you make the most of your space. It’s going to be a great day out!What’s more, you’ll be able to pick up even more expert advice from the drop in stages around the Show, from the Let’s Talk Plants Stage to the House Plant Hub. EXPERT ADVICE Garden inspiration Looking to be inspired for your own plot? There’s plenty to dig into at the ShowShow Gardens: Discover show-stopping gardens bursting with inspiration  APL Show Gardens: All designed to typical back garden sizes, these gardens are always packed with great ideas that you can apply to your own space. Beautiful Borders: Space-savvy ideas to make the most of your garden no matter the size of your plot.Showcase Gardens: Smaller than the Show Gardens, but bigger than the Beautiful Borders, the Showcase Gardens show what incredible results can be achieved in a compact garden setting. DISCOVER GARDEN INSPIRATION BBC Good Food Show Summer Entry to the BBC Good Food Show Summer is included with all tickets to BBC Gardeners’ World Live.The BBC Good Food Show Summer is a summer foodie celebration like no other! There’ll be food and drink to taste and buy, even create a tasty summer picnic to enjoy at the Show, with exhibitors on hand to serve up the best product knowledge and ingredients advice.  BBC GOOD FOOD SHOW SUMMER The Floral Marquee Browse one of the largest floral marquees in the country to find an incredible variety of plants for sale, direct from the growers. You’ll find stunning displays to inspire you and plenty of growing advice on hand. discover the floral marquee Toe-tapping live entertainment Enjoy live entertainment throughout your visit, with you’ll find toe-tapping tunes from the Bandstand. With the line-up soon to be announced, there’s something for everyone’s taste! /*! elementor - v3.19.0 - 07-02-2024 */ .elementor-widget-image-carousel .swiper,.elementor-widget-image-carousel .swiper-container{position:static}.elementor-widget-image-carousel .swiper-container .swiper-slide figure,.elementor-widget-image-carousel .swiper .swiper-slide figure{line-height:inherit}.elementor-widget-image-carousel .swiper-slide{text-align:center}.elementor-image-carousel-wrapper:not(.swiper-container-initialized):not(.swiper-initialized) .swiper-slide{max-width:calc(100% / var(--e-image-carousel-slides-to-show, 3))} For Expert Beginner Curious Young Seasoned All Gardeners Subscriber Club Lounge If you’re a subscriber to BBC Gardeners’ World Magazine, you’ll get to enjoy the Subscriber Club Lounge at the Show. Situated next to the BBC Gardeners’ World Live Theatre, you can watch your favourite presenter on stage, pick up some goodies and enjoy added extras including a morning welcome from the BBC Gardeners’ World Magazine team, on-hand for advice and info. To access the Lounge, simply bring along your voucher which you will receive alongside your e-tickets, and present it for scanning at the reception desk. Subcsriber tickets One-to-one expert advice In the heart of the Floral Marquee, you’ll find The Plant Experts. Their advice desk is the place to head for one-to-one gardening help, so come armed with questions!  THE PLANT EXPERTS So, what will you do first? Your ticket to BBC Gardeners’ World Live gives you access to a day blossoming with inspiring gardens, experts, fun activities, and inspiration. Whether you’re a seasoned gardener or just someone who loves soaking up the change in seasons, the Fair has something for everyone.Get ready to learn, explore, and have fun alongside fellow nature lovers at the Show– the ultimate celebration of all things gardening! BOOK YOUR TICKETS NOW What's on Find out more about tickets
Happy apple day!
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Happy Apple Day! Apple trees are a wonderful enhancement to any garden. During spring, their blossoms are a visual delight, and in autumn, their fruits offer a delectable taste. These trees can serve as a central element, adding structure to the garden, and they offer diverse habitats for a range of wildlife, including bees, birds, and moths. For more information about growing your own apples, take a look below with some tips from our friends at BBC Gardeners’ World Magazine. SUMMER PRUNING TIPS expert advice to help you grow Apple trees come in a variety of shapes and sizes, making them adaptable to gardens of all dimensions, thanks to the utilization of dwarfing rootstocks. These compact fruit trees remain small throughout their lifespan and can even thrive in containers. When cultivating apples, it’s essential to select a location with well-drained, moist soil and ample sunlight. Pruning should occur during either the summer or winter, depending on your tree’s desired shape, and apples should be harvested once they ripen. When to grow The optimal season for planting bare-root apple trees is winter. These trees are more cost-effective compared to their container-grown counterparts and offer a broader selection of varieties from fruit nurseries, spanning from October to March. The ultimate height of these trees varies depending on the rootstock they are grafted onto.Pot-grown apple trees, on the other hand, can be planted throughout the year. However, it’s crucial to keep in mind that the summer months often bring drier conditions, so keep them well watered. Planting When planting apple trees in your garden, it’s important to select a sunlit location and ensure there is ample space for branch growth. Even if your garden is small, don’t fret; you can also cultivate apple trees in fan, cordon, or espalier shapes, training and pruning them to be grown against walls, fences, or trellises.Before planting your apple tree, prepare the soil accordingly. Create a square hole, insert a tree stake, and position the tree within it. While adding soil around the tree, support the tree in place.Verify that the “graft point,” a slight swelling on the stem where the rootstock was grafted, is positioned just above the soil’s surface. Compact the soil around the roots to eliminate any air pockets and secure the stem to the stake. Ensure the tree receives consistent watering throughout the year. Caring If well maintained and fed, an apple tree will mature and crop for decades.Once a year in late winter, apply a balanced fertiliser, such as pelleted chicken manure, around the base of the tree. Encourage good flowering and fruit formation by applying sulphate of potash fertiliser. Each spring, spread a mulch of garden compost under the tree to condition the soil, hold in moisture and suppress weeds.  Your harvest Some apples start ripening in August, but most are ready in September and October. Pick them as they ripen to avoid fruits falling and being damaged. Cup them in your hand and lift. If the apple doesn’t pull away gently, leave it for another week.  Summer pruning tips Be inspired to grow at the Fair
Happy apple day!
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Happy Apple Day! Apple trees are a wonderful enhancement to any garden. During spring, their blossoms are a visual delight, and in autumn, their fruits offer a delectable taste. These trees can serve as a central element, adding structure to the garden, and they offer diverse habitats for a range of wildlife, including bees, birds, and moths. For more information about growing your own apples, take a look below with some tips from our friends at BBC Gardeners’ World Magazine. SUMMER PRUNING TIPS expert advice to help you grow Apple trees come in a variety of shapes and sizes, making them adaptable to gardens of all dimensions, thanks to the utilization of dwarfing rootstocks. These compact fruit trees remain small throughout their lifespan and can even thrive in containers. When cultivating apples, it’s essential to select a location with well-drained, moist soil and ample sunlight. Pruning should occur during either the summer or winter, depending on your tree’s desired shape, and apples should be harvested once they ripen. When to grow The optimal season for planting bare-root apple trees is winter. These trees are more cost-effective compared to their container-grown counterparts and offer a broader selection of varieties from fruit nurseries, spanning from October to March. The ultimate height of these trees varies depending on the rootstock they are grafted onto.Pot-grown apple trees, on the other hand, can be planted throughout the year. However, it’s crucial to keep in mind that the summer months often bring drier conditions, so keep them well watered. Planting When planting apple trees in your garden, it’s important to select a sunlit location and ensure there is ample space for branch growth. Even if your garden is small, don’t fret; you can also cultivate apple trees in fan, cordon, or espalier shapes, training and pruning them to be grown against walls, fences, or trellises.Before planting your apple tree, prepare the soil accordingly. Create a square hole, insert a tree stake, and position the tree within it. While adding soil around the tree, support the tree in place.Verify that the “graft point,” a slight swelling on the stem where the rootstock was grafted, is positioned just above the soil’s surface. Compact the soil around the roots to eliminate any air pockets and secure the stem to the stake. Ensure the tree receives consistent watering throughout the year. Caring If well maintained and fed, an apple tree will mature and crop for decades.Once a year in late winter, apply a balanced fertiliser, such as pelleted chicken manure, around the base of the tree. Encourage good flowering and fruit formation by applying sulphate of potash fertiliser. Each spring, spread a mulch of garden compost under the tree to condition the soil, hold in moisture and suppress weeds.  Your harvest Some apples start ripening in August, but most are ready in September and October. Pick them as they ripen to avoid fruits falling and being damaged. Cup them in your hand and lift. If the apple doesn’t pull away gently, leave it for another week.  Summer pruning tips Be inspired to grow at the Fair
Happy apple day!
0 comment
Happy Apple Day! Apple trees are a wonderful enhancement to any garden. During spring, their blossoms are a visual delight, and in autumn, their fruits offer a delectable taste. These trees can serve as a central element, adding structure to the garden, and they offer diverse habitats for a range of wildlife, including bees, birds, and moths. For more information about growing your own apples, take a look below with some tips from our friends at BBC Gardeners’ World Magazine. SUMMER PRUNING TIPS expert advice to help you grow Apple trees come in a variety of shapes and sizes, making them adaptable to gardens of all dimensions, thanks to the utilization of dwarfing rootstocks. These compact fruit trees remain small throughout their lifespan and can even thrive in containers. When cultivating apples, it’s essential to select a location with well-drained, moist soil and ample sunlight. Pruning should occur during either the summer or winter, depending on your tree’s desired shape, and apples should be harvested once they ripen. When to grow The optimal season for planting bare-root apple trees is winter. These trees are more cost-effective compared to their container-grown counterparts and offer a broader selection of varieties from fruit nurseries, spanning from October to March. The ultimate height of these trees varies depending on the rootstock they are grafted onto.Pot-grown apple trees, on the other hand, can be planted throughout the year. However, it’s crucial to keep in mind that the summer months often bring drier conditions, so keep them well watered. Planting When planting apple trees in your garden, it’s important to select a sunlit location and ensure there is ample space for branch growth. Even if your garden is small, don’t fret; you can also cultivate apple trees in fan, cordon, or espalier shapes, training and pruning them to be grown against walls, fences, or trellises.Before planting your apple tree, prepare the soil accordingly. Create a square hole, insert a tree stake, and position the tree within it. While adding soil around the tree, support the tree in place.Verify that the “graft point,” a slight swelling on the stem where the rootstock was grafted, is positioned just above the soil’s surface. Compact the soil around the roots to eliminate any air pockets and secure the stem to the stake. Ensure the tree receives consistent watering throughout the year. Caring If well maintained and fed, an apple tree will mature and crop for decades.Once a year in late winter, apply a balanced fertiliser, such as pelleted chicken manure, around the base of the tree. Encourage good flowering and fruit formation by applying sulphate of potash fertiliser. Each spring, spread a mulch of garden compost under the tree to condition the soil, hold in moisture and suppress weeds.  Your harvest Some apples start ripening in August, but most are ready in September and October. Pick them as they ripen to avoid fruits falling and being damaged. Cup them in your hand and lift. If the apple doesn’t pull away gently, leave it for another week.  Summer pruning tips Be inspired to grow at the Show
One ticket, so many opportunities!
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Discover everything included in your Spring Fair ticket! One ticket, a Fair-load of seasonal inspiration!In this helpful guide you can uncover all the garden inspiration to be had with a ticket to the BBC Gardeners’ World Spring Fair in May 2024. BOOK YOUR TICKETS NOW Experts live on stage With no need to book, simply drop in to hear from gardening experts to find out how to make the most of the new growing season this spring.BBC Gardeners’ World Magazine Stage: Adam Frost, Frances Tophill and others will take centre stage with the magazine’s insightful editorial team, as they share top tips on how to make the most of your plot this growing season. Let’s Grow stage: Eager to cultivate your own garden haven or just starting to sow seeds? Head over to the Let’s Grow stage for of grow-your-own inspiration and top tips from a variety of experts. Explore all of Beaulieu Not only does your ticket give you access to the Spring Fair, but also the chance to explore everything Beaulieu has to offer.National Motor MuseumHistoric Victorian Palace House800 year old AbbeyThe monorail, celebrating it’s 50th year in 2024Little Beaulieu adventure playgroundCafe, shop, gardens and more Garden inspiration Looking to be inspired for your own plot? The Spring Fair has it all for you to explore!Beautiful Borders: Space-savvy ideas to make the most of your garden no matter the size of your plot.Showcase Gardens: Find inspiration for a productive garden throughout the colder monthsCollege Competition: Returning for a second year, horticultural colleges compete to create the best budget-friendly garden.  Club Lounge If you’re a BBC Gardeners’ World Subscriber or a Hillier Gardening Club Member, enjoy access to the Club Lounge, with perks including:Talks from BBC Gardeners’ World Magazine editors with special guests Additional refreshment optionsExtra seating Just the ticket for you... Choose the tickets that best suits you, with options including: Under 5s go FREE, and discounted tickets for under 15s.  Discounted Family tickets  Discounted tickets for adults and children with disabilities, plus free carer tickets Concession prices for over 60s BBC Gardeners’ World Magazine subscribers save by using their unique 10-digit subscriber number when booking Discounts for visitors in groups of 15+FREE PARKING available at the Beaulieu attraction for ALL visitors. Book here > Cloister tours Join a free tour of the Beaulieu’s historic Abbey and walk in the footsteps of medieval monks from over 800 years ago. Tours offer insight into the site’s heritage and how the herb garden shaped the lives of the monks.Victorian Gardeners will be in the gardens to answer questions and share information on the Abbey’s history, the Cistercian monks that settled there and the history behind their herb garden. Entertainment & BBC Good Food Market Enjoy live entertainment throughout your visit, with you’ll find toe-tapping tunes from the Bandstand. With the line-up soon to be announced, there’s something for everyone’s taste!Plus, pick up a bespoke picnic with delicious artisanal food for every kind palate available at the BBC Good Food Market. So, what will you do first? Your ticket to BBC Gardeners’ World Spring Fair gives you access to a day blossoming with inspiring gardens, experts, fun activities, and inspiration. Get ready to learn, explore, and have fun alongside fellow nature lovers at the Fair – the ultimate celebration of all things spring! BOOK YOUR TICKETS NOW